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How to Sell Local SEO Like a Pro

For your con­ve­nience, we record­ed our Boost Your Busi­ness: How to Sell Local SEO Like a Pro webi­nar.

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Webinar Transcript

[Down­load­able ver­sions of this tran­script, the pre­sen­ta­tion deck, and oth­er mate­ri­als will be avail­able in the Dash­board Resource Cen­ter]

Bernard:

Wel­come back every­one, and after a long hia­tus from our Boost Your Busi­ness webi­na­rs, I’m back. It’s Bernard again doing the next series of our webi­na­rs. Now, just to give you guys a heads up of what we’re cov­er­ing, and you guys prob­a­bly received the newslet­ter on this, we’re going to talk about How to Sell Local SEO Like a Pro.

[slide: About the Pan­elists]

And for those of you that have been, you know lucky enough I guess, because I think I’m a nice guy, that were lucky enough to meet me, I am Bernard and I’m the gen­er­al man­ag­er of SEO­Re­seller. We’ve recent­ly updat­ed my pho­to, so I’m not semi-bald any­more, and it does say 20 years’ worth of web expe­ri­ence, but the inter­est­ing per­son to talk about actu­al­ly in this intro­duc­tion is Rob. And I’ll let Rob do his own intro­duc­tion.

Rob:

Thank you, Bernard. Hi every­one! It’s great to be here. It’s an hon­or. What can I say? Pro­fes­sion­al work is hard work, and with the right method­ol­o­gy, rank­ing web­sites is less chal­leng­ing. And it’s fun, and it’s more fun and excit­ing to see­ing our cus­tomers or part­ners grow. So, let’s get the ball rolling. My cre­den­tials are in front of you, and it should be great.

Bernard:

So, right before we get start­ed on the meat of the con­ver­sa­tion, though, I want to explain the rea­son why I asked Rob to join us on this webi­nar. Before he was a busi­ness devel­op­ment offi­cer, Rob was one of our project man­agers and he is one of the guys with the most spec­tac­u­lar results in terms of suc­cess when it comes to help­ing local busi­ness­es. And I thought who bet­ter to bring into a webi­nar than a guy with proven track record of help­ing local small busi­ness­es, and these are pre­cise­ly the types of peo­ple that we are going to talk about today, the guys that we’re going to try to help.

[slide: What Hap­pened Dur­ing the Pre­vi­ous Webi­nar]

So, in keep­ing with our tra­di­tion this is what hap­pened dur­ing the pre­vi­ous webi­nar. For every­body lis­ten­ing or for every­body that was there on the pre­vi­ous one, so pre­vi­ous­ly you guys spent an hour with Joshua and with William, and they talked about the Rep­u­ta­tion Man­age­ment tool that we built for you and your clients. And it’s about how you can build a recur­ring rev­enue mod­el with the Rep­u­ta­tion Man­age­ment tool; how it can help man­age the per­cep­tion of the busi­ness; how it can help you grow your busi­ness. And then a cou­ple of tips and tricks in terms of how to sell it.

[slide: Shame­less Plug]

Also in keep­ing with the tra­di­tion of our webi­na­rs is our shame­less plug. Now for this month and until August, we’re extend­ing the July pro­mos. And this is where if you spend an ini­tial $3,000 on SEO with us, you get $1,000 off on your first month. The cam­paigns have to start in July and August.

Now in addi­tion to that, we also have a cou­ple of new fea­tures that are launch­ing today right after the webi­nar, but I thought not to insert it in the shame­less plug because I felt that they belong bet­ter in the spe­cif­ic sec­tions of the webi­nar where we’re talk­ing about how to con­nect, how to retain, and how to nur­ture.

[slide: Dis­cus­sion Overview]

With­out fur­ther ado, this is what we’re going to wind up cov­er­ing today, and this is the overview of what we’re going to talk about ide­al­ly for the next 45 to 50 min­utes, so that we’ve got time for your ques­tions. And speak­ing of ques­tions, feel free to use the upper right box on your screen and mes­sage us your ques­tions, so that we can get to them at the end of the webi­nar.

So, what we’re cov­er­ing today is why local SEO; why sell it as a ser­vice; what’s in it for a for a small busi­ness own­er; the evo­lu­tion of local SEO – and I promise only to take one to two min­utes, it’s just a nice visu­al rep­re­sen­ta­tion of how local SEO has evolved over the years – what we do to rank your clients local­ly. And we’re going to go through this in pass­ing because when we teach you to pitch and even when we pitch, it’s not about drown­ing your client in sub­ject-mat­ter exper­tise; it is about build­ing that con­nec­tion. And that’s why we’re going to spend the most amount in how to sell local SEO, and then we’re going to cov­er a few typ­i­cal objec­tions that you guys are like­ly to encounter and how to effec­tive­ly over­come them.

So, let’s get start­ed. Why local SEO? Rob, why local SEO?

[slide: Why Local SEO]

Rob:

Let me tell you guys why. Have you noticed like how a local result have tak­en up more and more real estate in search? And if you are in Google’s shoes, wouldn’t that make sense if over 60% of users spend to search for things, busi­ness­es, ser­vices, or prod­ucts that it can go to. This is why they try to dis­play the results of these search­es bet­ter for the users, and they now dom­i­nate above-the-fold search.

[slide: The Bat­tle for Real Estate on the SERPs]

And that’s where we go to the first bul­let point, or you know, the bat­tle for the real estate. What bet­ter way to dom­i­nate the results page than to occu­py most of the space on it. Local search results get exact­ly this. Google is real­ly help­ing busi­ness­es that have phys­i­cal loca­tions that need peo­ple to dri­ve to their loca­tion, and make a trans­ac­tion. Users need to be able to find these results faster, and Google always wants the best result for your users. If you have not seen the local Snack Pack yet, try search­ing a restau­rant local­ly, and find that first three results occu­py­ing 80% of the page, whether it’s on desk­top or

on a mobile device.

Bernard:

And actu­al­ly, on mobile, it takes up more real estate – almost the entire ini­tial screen on a mobile is the Snack Pack. Now, if you think about what Rob just said, your Google, it’s your busi­ness, and you’re real­iz­ing that 60 to 64 per­cent of your users are always look­ing for a busi­ness, a ser­vice, a provider whose office they can walk into. Wouldn’t it make sense that you use the real estate of your web­site to present them results that match the pur­pose of their search, and this is why to me the Snack Pack feels like an almost inevitable evo­lu­tion of how search has evolved over the years.

[slide: All the Ben­e­fits of Organ­ic SEO]

Now, one of the oth­er rea­sons why you guys should sell local SEO is that it gains all the ben­e­fits of organ­ic SEO. When we work on organ­ic cam­paigns for you guys, our objec­tive is to make you guys rank on the first page. On local search, we large­ly fol­low the same method­ol­o­gy, but with a few dif­fer­ences here and there. We build cita­tions, we build busi­ness list­ings, but on local search, the mis­sion isn’t over until your busi­ness is in the local result or it’s in the Snack Pack. There­fore, you always wind up above the fold. And this is one of the ben­e­fits of doing local SEO, because you get all the ben­e­fits of organ­ic. And then plus-plus. Not to men­tion, it’s slight­ly eas­i­er to do. I’ll actu­al­ly let Rob dive into that because he’s got a lot of expe­ri­ence on this.

[slide: High­er Suc­cess Rate and Faster Results]

Rob:

Yeah. Thank you for let­ting me take this one, Bernard. And you know what, high­er suc­cess rate brings us to the third point and faster results, because let me tell you from expe­ri­ence, 80% of the cam­paigns I’ve han­dled are local busi­ness­es. And it still amazes me to this day that 92% of them pen­e­trat­ed the Snack Pack in 90 days or less. Also, some­thing we’ve learned through­out, you know, the course of doing these cam­paigns, local­ly, there are not a lot of busi­ness­es who are doing SEO, and when they do any dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing, like what Bernard told us about, they’re not putting it all togeth­er and not dri­ving results.

Bernard:

Right. And I think that’s a very impor­tant point to dri­ve home when you guys start walk­ing in and doing your pitch­es to these local small busi­ness­es, what you’ll real­ize is they’re run­ning a Face­book cam­paign here, they’re build­ing a cou­ple of busi­ness list­ings there, they sub­mit­ted and they claim their pro­file on Google My Busi­ness, or they’re doing some organ­ic SEO, they’re doing some link build­ing. But, very few of them would have all of these activ­i­ties in con­cert, very few of them are doing this alto­geth­er, and the results of when they’re all done togeth­er is tremen­dous. You occu­py space on Google search above the fold, and that’s just not the results that you get.

Rob:

And the most impor­tant result that you want is foot traf­fic.

[slide: Evo­lu­tion of Local Search]

Bernard:

Right, pre­cise­ly. So, mov­ing on, I just want­ed to show you guys how local search evolved over the years, and I’m real­ly going to start from pre-Pan­da here. So, this is a screen­shot of Google Maps. For any of you guys that have been dig­i­tal­ly-savvy before 2012, you’ll remem­ber hav­ing to do a search and hav­ing to go into the Maps mod­ule of Google in order to find local results in your area.

This is how it ini­tial­ly hap­pened – 2012 Google decid­ed to blend the results, and this is what it ini­tial­ly looked like, not as pret­ty as it does today. But, this one real­ly took SEOs for explain in 2012, and SEO in the indus­try called it the Venice update, which was the first time peo­ple saw local results blend­ed with organ­ic results.

A year lat­er, Google refines that fur­ther with Google Places, and this is when we start­ed see­ing what SEO is called the 3‑Pack and the 7‑Pack mixed inside the first page of the result, but not nec­es­sar­i­ly above the fold where three to sev­en local results if a search was done with a geo tar­get­ed key­word.

A year lat­er, that evolved into Google Plus local, and the knowl­edge graph appeared on the right. You still get a mix of about three to sev­en busi­ness­es post­ed on the first page. And today’s results are the Snack Pack, and the evo­lu­tion of Google My Busi­ness, where you’re see­ing a small map at the top, the three top loca­tions – if three are avail­able, it is pos­si­ble to only see two – a link to their web­site, and direc­tions to get there based on where you’re locat­ed. And right at the bot­tom of that begins the organ­ic search results.

One of the oth­er things I just want­ed to point out is as we went through each image, because I just noticed how sub­tle the changes were from one to the oth­er, and this is real­ly how Google evolves, and very sub­tle, more use­ful ways for its users.

Now mov­ing on to the next top­ic – what does it take to rank local­ly?

[slide: What Does It Take to Rank Local­ly?]

Rob:

So, here’s what we have to do. As Bernard men­tioned ear­li­er, it’s all the organ­ic activ­i­ties and a lit­tle bit of more. First, we def­i­nite­ly would have to take a look at your web­site or your on-page, your con­tent since it is the strongest rank­ing fac­tor, your images has to be diverse, the site struc­ture, and the lit­tle things that makes a web­site tick. That’s what we will have to take a look at first.

But, a lit­tle bit of the bul­let points. The first one say from Moz’s local search rank­ing fac­tors, local search or the local pack is 14% on-page and 24% for organ­ic. What you real­ly have to take a look at is your Name, Address, and Phone on your site. These are need­ed to be vis­i­ble com­plete and con­sis­tent.

Bernard:

Right. I guess the to put it in layman’s terms, or actu­al­ly techie terms that I’ll turn into layman’s terms, these are what you refer to as user con­tent, mean­ing they need to be con­tent that a user can see on a web­site. And then, of course, your loca­tion-spe­cif­ic key­words, them indi­cat­ed in your H1, in the URL, or on any oth­er ele­ment that the search engine can read.

Rob:

Yeah. Mov­ing on to the sec­ond bul­let point is our schema. So make it crys­tal clear, so Google knows where you are at and what you do. So, schema is a piece of code that lets search engines know that you are a local busi­ness, that it this is your name, address, and phone. The infor­ma­tion in it is cru­cial; it will deter­mine if you are the best result.

Bernard:

Right. Now one thing to take note is that schema can be done in dif­fer­ent ways, and it doesn’t always apply to local busi­ness­es. But, this is what makes local dif­fer­ent from organ­ic. When we apply schema to a web­site that’s meant to rank local­ly, we apply local schema, we make sure that Google under­stands where you’re locat­ed and that you’re rel­e­vant for that loca­tion.

Rob:

And def­i­nite­ly the off-page, or the back­link or the link build­ing process. So, these are the guests blogs, the edi­to­ri­als that we post, but more­over, it is real­ly just the noise about you on the web. Not only does it rank you organ­i­cal­ly, but it also helps your busi­ness appear in the local search results.

Bernard:

Right. When we devel­oped this ser­vice, what we real­ly did was to do a test of how does the local search result respond to X num­ber of busi­ness list­ings. Does it respond well to that? Does it also respond to back­links? And what we dis­cov­ered is that it responds to both, or, actu­al­ly, it responds best when both are present. And it does respond when only one or the oth­er exists, but the best results are achieved when both are done. And that’s why this is how the ser­vice is exe­cut­ed.

Now, quick ques­tion is what are cita­tions? Cita­tions are sim­ply arti­cles that men­tion your brand name or your home­page URL, your busi­ness address, and your phone num­ber. So, that means your busi­ness is cit­ed inside someone’s con­tent. Now in the last activ­i­ty that we do our busi­ness list­ings.

Rob:

And you know, you have to put your busi­ness into rel­e­vant list­ings, so some of them are Face­book fan pages, Yelp, 192 Big Places, or Foursquare. These are some of the direc­to­ries that are wide­ly used by our users and great­ly rel­e­vant sig­nals for search engines. And, of course, don’t for­get Google My Busi­ness, as well.

The next would be your Name, Address, and Phone have to be con­sis­tent across the review pages of your web­site.

Bernard:

Right. Also gives you anoth­er chan­nel to acquire feed­back from cus­tomers, right? And this is some­thing that got dis­cussed in the Rep­u­ta­tion Man­age­ment webi­nar that was done last month. It is more impor­tant now more than ever for local busi­ness­es to keep their ears to the ground and lis­ten for how their brand is being talked about local­ly.

[slide: How to Sell Local SEO]

Mov­ing us onto the meat of the con­ver­sa­tion, and before we do a deep dive, I just want­ed to remind every­one – feel free to send your ques­tions to us via the chat box on the upper right side of your screen.

So, with­out fur­ther ado, Rob and I will jump into how to sell local SEO, and these are the top­ics we intend to cov­er. Step 0 is prep. This is the home­work that you have to do, the things you do before you walk into a sale because the moment you man­age to get an appoint­ment, that becomes Step 1, where you try to build a con­nec­tion with your cus­tomers, you try to relate the val­ue of your ser­vice to the needs of their busi­ness. Step 2 would be when you qual­i­fy, because while you can get any­where from three to 3000 poten­tial leads, not all of them deserve your time, not all of them will qual­i­fy for your ser­vice, or not all of them are ready. Now Step 3 will be build­ing desire. I guess our aver­age con­ver­sion time for SEO ranges some­where between any­where from 30 days to about 90 days, so it takes a while for them to be ready and dur­ing that phase you don’t have to be pas­sive; you can build their desire over time in order for you to get clos­er to Step 4, which is a close, and then, of course, we’ll try to add more val­ue to your con­ver­sa­tion by going through a cou­ple of com­mon objec­tions.

So, let’s get start­ed.

[slide: Step 0 Prepa­ra­tion]

Rob:

Step 0 is prepa­ra­tion, and per­son­al­ly guys, this is where I thrive on 100% of the time. This is what we do in prepa­ra­tion because most peo­ple miss the most impor­tant goal, and that’s your emo­tion­al objec­tives. Tar­get an emo­tion­al goal; don’t be inci­den­tal­ly lik­able. Don’t wing your sales pitch all the time. Devel­op your exper­tise. Go to our Resource Cen­ter, down­load our white papers, our pitch kit. So, click on the Resource on your dash­board, scroll all the way down, there’s an SEO pitch kit over there, and it has two dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing sta­tis­tics and our method­ol­o­gy. It also comes with a Pow­er­Point pre­sen­ta­tion, sav­ing you the grunt work of build­ing a pre­sen­ta­tion and get­ting the things that mat­ter to your prospects, which are their needs.

Bernard:

And the rea­son we pre-build these things is because we appre­ci­ate the fact that your time is best spent mak­ing those con­nec­tions and clos­ing those sales. So, instead of you guys, you know, slav­ing the night away, build­ing a Pow­er­Point pre­sen­ta­tion on a rush sched­ule, we’ve tak­en the time and the trou­ble to be able to pre-build these for you guys.

Rob:

And I guess in prepa­ra­tion, you will real­ly have to take a look at your brand because the ques­tion real­ly is why do you deserve to earn your prospects’ busi­ness? The first bul­let point would be choos­ing a niche. Spe­cial­iz­ing in a niche allows you to be an expert in two fields, so that’s dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing and your prospects’ ver­ti­cal. We under­stand that it’s tempt­ing to cast a wide net, but you can gain bet­ter famil­iar­i­ty and gain a track record for a spe­cif­ic niche.

Bernard:

Right. Case in point is, imag­ine you guys are walk­ing into a dentist’s office, and you’re try­ing to do a pitch, and this den­tist has a choice of between two types of mar­keters: one jack-of-all-trades mar­keter and the oth­er one is a mar­keter with a proven track record in help­ing oth­er than this achieve suc­cess. Who do you think they would be like­ly to go to? And this is why nich­ing is so impor­tant.

The next one, of course, is devel­op­ing the iden­ti­ty of your brand, or what is your unique sell­ing propo­si­tion.

Rob:

Yeah. Ask your­self why they should choose you. Are you going to be the biggest, fastest-grow­ing, most sin­cere­ly car­ing ven­dor they’ve had? Devel­op your brand’s per­sona, then make your per­son­al per­sona sup­port that.

Bernard:

Right. And when Rob says per­son­al per­sona, what he means by that is remem­ber that if you can Google their busi­ness, if you can do your prep and research about their busi­ness, they can Google you. So, what are they going to see when they look for you on Face­book? What are they going to see when they look for you on LinkedIn? So, more on build­ing social proof.

Rob:

Yeah, and we’ll dive into that lat­er on. Do your­self a favor, so on social proof win the first impres­sion. Dan Ariely, a behav­ioral econ­o­mist expert and pro­fes­sor at MIT, Bernard you men­tioned this to me, and so I Google them, so sev­er­al exper­i­ments at MIT and oth­er Ivy League schools, just the first impres­sion lasts. You can read about it in his book “Pre­dictably Irra­tional”. But, what’s impor­tant to remem­ber is in a dig­i­tal word, if you can Google your prospect, they can Google you like what you’ve men­tioned. And when they do, what can they see?

Bernard:

Right. And you guys can do a mock exper­i­ment here. Try look­ing for the Project Man­agers of SEO­Re­seller. Take a look at who they’re con­nect­ed to, who vouch­es for their skills, because their per­sona mat­ters to us. How we devel­op our Project Man­agers and our sales staff’s per­sona needs to be the way you devel­op your per­sona.

Now, aside from doing your research on your brand, you also have to take a look at the envi­ron­ment, right?

Rob:

Exact­ly. As much as you research your­self, do bet­ter and dou­ble your effort to learn more about who you’re sell­ing to. So, research your prospect. Who’s on the first page for the key­words in their indus­try? Where do they stand against the com­pe­ti­tion? How old is their web­site? So, it tells you how long they began their dig­i­tal con­scious­ness and the gap between that and their dig­i­tal matu­ri­ty. So, first there is real­ly their busi­ness. Learn their busi­ness – what they do, how they do it, when they do it, and who they cater to. These are all assets to your pitch, so find out what they need to hear, then tell them in a man­ner that they will embrace it.

Bernard:

I like the way you put that Rob, because that is very impor­tant. You need to be able to deliv­er it in a way that they will choose to embrace because nobody likes to be sold. We all want to buy, but none of us like get­ting sold.

Rob:

Yeah. Then, when you know their busi­ness, of course, the indus­try, are they B2B? B2C? Are they in mar­ket­ing or IT? The more you under­stand their indus­try, the more you become one of them.

Bernard:

Right, and the less you’re like­ly to get treat­ed as an out­sider or a stranger.

Now the next one is, of course, help them find their oppor­tu­ni­ties. You have to be able to match the val­ue of your ser­vice to what the needs of their busi­ness are. Are you going to help them make more mon­ey? Beat the com­pe­ti­tion? Gain larg­er mar­ket share? Are you going to help them gain a larg­er client base? Are you going to help them gain bet­ter dif­fer­en­ti­a­tion? All of these are ques­tions you need to unearth dur­ing the qual­i­fy­ing phase, but even in prep, I strong­ly rec­om­mend that you guys ready six to ten great ques­tions, and I’ll get to that when we get to qual­i­fy­ing.

Before I con­clude the prep slide, though, I just want to repeat the growth hack that we’re try­ing to teach you. Very few sales­peo­ple walk into a pitch with an emo­tion­al goal in mind, and you always should, regard­less of the fact that we all like to think we’re ratio­nal deci­sion-mak­ers, we are all emo­tion­al buy­ers. And you need to respect this and lever­age it to your advan­tage. That’s why you need to build a con­nec­tion.

[slide: Step 1 Con­nect – Find­ing Leads]

So, speak­ing of con­nec­tion, here’s how you con­nect. You can’t con­nect with any­one if you don’t have a list of leads or prospects, and so Step 1 on con­nec­tion – because this is a two-step of con­nec­tion process – is where do you find your leads?

We sent out a solic­i­ta­tion to you guys ask­ing you guys for what your advice would be to oth­er start­ing and bou­tique agen­cies out there in terms of being able to begin a net­work of leads? Domini­ca said net­work­ing, expose, trade shows, sem­i­nars, attend them. And Domini­ca, we com­plete­ly agree.

In fact, today, the screen on the right is show­ing you the SEO­Re­seller audit plug-in. We built it specif­i­cal­ly to launch today right in time for the webi­nar because what we want you to be able to do is, right after the webi­nar, we want you to do your research, find the trade shows, the expose, or the sem­i­nars that are hap­pen­ing in your area, and sign up. Meet peo­ple, exchange busi­ness cards because you’re a sales­man and you’re prob­a­bly astute. Imag­ine you walk­ing in and net­work­ing and exchang­ing busi­ness cards and notic­ing “Hey I notice that your email address is in that domain, you know what I’ve got my web­site on my phone, and I’ve got a new tool that we just built inside our web­site and it can give you an audit of how good the SEO is on your site. Would you mind us run­ning this on your web­site?” You will prob­a­bly wind up col­lect­ing emails faster than you can sell pan­cakes.

The next one is ask for refer­rals. No man is an island, and, you know, I’m not just say­ing that as a cliché. You go to a den­tist, you’ve got a physi­cian, you prob­a­bly use ven­dors of your own, but let’s take the den­tist for exam­ple. If you’ve got a great rela­tion­ship with your den­tist, your den­tist has an inte­ri­or dec­o­ra­tor, a med­ical sup­pli­er, some­body that builds splints for them, prob­a­bly a plumber, and all of these guys, also busi­ness­es, why not lever­age your rela­tion­ship with your first-lev­el con­tact in order to gain a con­nec­tion with sec­ond degree con­tacts?

The next one is cold email with style. Now what do I mean when I say cold email with style? I’m going to pull some­thing off of Joe Girard’s play­book, and it’s about car shows and test dri­ves. When you cold email, what you need to do is do the same thing car sales­men do inside of a car show. Car sales­men don’t try to sell cars in a car show; what they try to do is sell a test dri­ve. They’d be lucky to close three peo­ple for every thou­sand inquiries they get inside a car show, but it’s been proven that a test dri­ve will close three out of sev­en peo­ple that take a test dri­ve. So, your only objec­tive here is to gain a com­mit­ment or to gain an appoint­ment.

Rob:

And more impor­tant­ly, I’ll tell you some­thing that’s very sim­ple to do but equal­ly impor­tant. Test email tem­plates and find out which of them con­verts the most, you know gets the best respons­es and gets opened more.

Bernard:

Right. So, opti­miza­tion is real­ly not just for search; you also have to opti­mize your own mar­ket­ing process, right? If you real­ize that email tem­plate sheet com­pared to A and B gets opened more, gets replied to more, which is you know the ulti­mate, or even bet­ter yet tem­plate B gets you more appoint­ment, stick with the email tem­plate that gets you the best results.

The oth­er one is cold call­ing with a lot of con­vic­tion. And what I mean when cold call­ing is you know send­ing the email and ask­ing for an appoint­ment means that by the time you start your first phone call, you’re not a stranger any­more, and you begin to cre­ate a warmer rela­tion­ship. Remem­ber the call’s pur­pose and the email’s pur­pose are the same – it is to secure an appoint­ment. Don’t try to close them on email, don’t try to close them on a call, close them face-to-face.

Next is when you do get man­aged to get an appoint­ment, don’t make the mis­take of sell­ing rank­ings. Don’t sell a SERP posi­tion; pitch a com­mit­ment. We want to buy from peo­ple that we trust, like, and respect, and we tend to trust, like, and respect peo­ple that believe in our busi­ness the way we do, and so it cre­ates com­mon ground between you and your prospect.

The next one comes from Tom, and Tom says he builds ven­dor part­ner­ships with web­mas­ters. And, you know, in our opin­ion, that’s bril­liant. This is also how some of our ini­tial and best rela­tion­ships start­ed where we part­nered up with peo­ple that only sold web­sites and they move the SEO busi­ness to us because it wasn’t their line of exper­tise. And Tom is absolute­ly right. If you guys part­ner up with peo­ple that have web devel­op­ment busi­ness­es, noth­ing stops you from being able to gain refer­rals com­ing from these ven­dor part­ner­ships.

Now the oth­er one is, of course, lever­ag­ing busi­ness with Google My Busi­ness. Go to Google My Busi­ness and check out the local busi­ness­es in your area, find out who’s got reviews, who’s got a web­site, who doesn’t, peo­ple that have oth­er list­ings, no list­ings, and this trick is actu­al­ly attrib­uted to Chuck. It’s a great tac­ti­cal tech­nique. In fact, what we even tell peo­ple is one of the eas­i­est ways to fig­ure out where your leads are is when you do a search for a key­word that’s rel­e­vant for the busi­ness, take a look at who’s between posi­tions 11 to 100, all of them have oppor­tu­ni­ties to ben­e­fit from local search.

Now, you’ve done your home­work, and you secured an appoint­ment, what do you do next?

[slide: Step 1 Con­nect – Build­ing Rap­port]

Rob:

Guys, this is cru­cial – build­ing rap­port – so whether or not you’d get a sec­ond date, it would real­ly depend on the time you spent on a date. Do they want to have fun? Learn some­thing or share a moment. So, you men­tioned Joe Girard, and this is why we love him, because he has been rec­og­nized by the Guin­ness Book of World Records as the world’s great­est sales­man. He sold 13,001 cars at a Chevy deal­er­ship, and he did it by hav­ing a very good rela­tion­ship with his cus­tomers. He was good at get­ting them to buy from him. He was very good at remem­ber­ing his cus­tomers’ names, their wives, their birth dates, and he remem­bers to call them on Christ­mas and Thanks­giv­ing, but he made it a point to be their friend first. And every­one is very com­fort­able hav­ing a friend. And one bril­liant thing he did was his per­sona. He was a fel­low car enthu­si­ast, not their car sales­man.

Bernard:

Right. Which actu­al­ly brings us to our growth hack for this slide. Pulling some­thing out of Joe Girardi’s play­book, be their SEO expert, not their SEO sales­man. The same way Joe was a fel­low car enthu­si­ast and not their car sales­man. By not being their sales­man and by being some­one that they could buy from and not some­one that was sell­ing to them, he was able to earn trust, respect, and lik­ing.

Rob:

That’s right, guys. That’s why don’t focus on clos­ing; focus on build­ing the rela­tion­ship. Much like Joe, it’s about con­nec­tion, not a close. Refrain from jump­ing the gun and ask­ing them what you want or drilling into how much they are will­ing to spend right away. It gives peo­ple the sense that you’re after your agen­da, not theirs. So, peo­ple want to buy; they don’t want to be sold. We all want to think that we made the best log­i­cal deci­sion when we make a pur­chase.

The next one is they like, trust, or respect you. We lis­ten to peo­ple who we respect. Case in point, how many of you guys have shopped bring­ing a com­pan­ion in tow? All things being equal, we will buy from friends or when we trust the peo­ple we buy from. So, we don’t look back or regret a pur­chase.

Bernard:

Do you shop with a com­pan­ion in tow?

Rob:

Of course.

Bernard:

I’ve shopped with a com­pan­ion in tow. Not more often than not, but I have. So, I think we’re all guilty of that and that’s because we try to avoid what’s called buyer’s remorse. And it tends to hap­pen when peo­ple part ways with mon­ey. It’s not because they bought some­thing that was with­out val­ue, it’s just a phe­nom­e­non that tends to hap­pen. But, by hav­ing some­body emo­tion­al­ly rein­force the buy­ing deci­sion, you are less like­ly to encounter buyer’s remorse.

Rob:

And here are some of the things that you can do – you already do this uncon­scious­ly, most of you guys – here we give you the sci­ence.

The first one is com­mon ground. We’ve men­tioned this ear­li­er, as well. But, all you need is one thing, just one thing in com­mon with your prospect, and that’s enough to accel­er­ate the bond­ing process. Exam­ine your clos­est friend­ships. How many things do you real­ly have in com­mon with your clos­est friends? Have you trav­eled to anoth­er coun­try (Bernard, I know you’re guilty of this) ide­al­ly where Eng­lish is not spo­ken and real­ize you’ve found your­self warm­ing to an Amer­i­ca that you man­aged to come across. That is com­mon ground.

Bernard:

A great exam­ple is, Eng­lish is my lan­guage of pref­er­ence, pri­ma­ry lan­guage, and it’s what we speak at home. And when­ev­er I trav­el, I like to go to strange places and, you know, I don’t know why I like the good places where no one speaks Eng­lish, but I do, and when­ev­er I find any­one that speaks Eng­lish, I will imme­di­ate­ly warm up to them. And that is an exam­ple of com­mon ground at work.

Now guys, before I let Rob con­tin­ue, I’m hop­ing that you guys have your notepads open on your lap­tops, or that you’ve got a pen and paper in hand, because it’s very impor­tant for you guys to remem­ber these con­cepts that we’re talk­ing about, and if you can man­age to write them down or com­mit them to mem­o­ry, please do so. With­out any more delays, I’ll let Rob con­tin­ue.

Rob:

Right in time, because humor is very impor­tant, as well.

Bernard:

Yes, this is a favorite of mine.

Rob:

Stud­ies say that humor con­tributes to high­er sub­jec­tive well-being. It’s a per­va­sive part of human expe­ri­ence, so it is usu­al­ly asso­ci­at­ed with pos­i­tiv­i­ty and the feel­ing of being pos­i­tive cre­ates a good con­nec­tion, as well. So, tak­ing some of this from Jef­frey Gitomer’s play­book, if you can get them to laugh, you can get them to buy.

Bernard:

And I’m a stal­wart believ­er of that prin­ci­ple. Git­o­mer always says, “If you can get them to laugh, you can get them to buy.” Now, the rea­son these first two tech­niques are so impor­tant is because com­mon ground and humor are amaz­ing accel­er­a­tors of a bond­ing process. If you guys want to emo­tion­al­ly con­nect with some­one, find some­thing in com­mon or be fun­ny. If you’re not fun­ny…

Rob:

Get fun­ny now.

Bernard:

Right. Get fun­ny. It’s nev­er too late.

Rob:

For me, this is my favorite. It’s Me-Talk, because it’s the eas­i­est part – you just lis­ten. Lim­it your air­time. If you’re talk­ing more than 50% of the time, you’re fail­ing the sales. So, peo­ple love talk­ing about them­selves and their busi­ness. The more air­time they get, the more com­fort­able they become, and the more needs you unearth.

Bernard:

Right. And think about it guys, and think about your friend­ships. Who are the peo­ple that are clos­est to you and you enjoy the com­pa­ny the most? Are they the best talk­ers, or are they the best lis­ten­ers? And this is what Me-Talk real­ly teach­es you. It allows you to sur­ren­der your agen­da. It makes you sub­ject your agen­da and pri­or­i­tize the agen­da of your prospect. It’s about you lis­ten­ing and you doing less talk­ing.

The next one is mir­ror­ing, and I think this one I want to take, because this is real­ly basic pro­gram­ming, and behav­ioral eco­nom­ics, and psy­chol­o­gy at work. In the same way that, so in a in a book called “The Influ­encer” and actu­al­ly sev­er­al oth­er behav­ioral eco­nom­ics books, there’s a study that shows that when peo­ple are in sync, when they’re agree­able with each oth­er, they tend to copy each other’s body lan­guage. While, you know, there are sales peo­ple that will use this in a manip­u­la­tive way, how we rec­om­mend you use mir­ror­ing is use it as an indi­ca­tor of whether you’re doing a good job in your pitch. Is your sales pitch head­ed in the right direc­tion? Are you man­ag­ing to make that con­nec­tion? Because if you do, what you’ll notice is, as you change pos­ture, your prospects will fol­low your pos­ture – either that or you may uncon­scious­ly fol­low theirs. But, what mat­ters is that you guys fol­low each other’s body lan­guage. You can use this as a gauge for whether you did well in the pitch or on build­ing that con­nec­tion or not.

Now, before we progress out of this slide, I just want to remind you guys about the growth hack. Be their expert, not their sales­man. Nobody wants to get sold, but we all love to buy.

So, let’s move on to the next step, which is qual­i­fy­ing.

[slide: Step 2 Qual­i­fy]

Qual­i­fy­ing is impor­tant because, again, while you can have any­where from 3 to 3,000 prospects, not all of them deserve your time. You want to focus on the guys that make good use of your time, the ones that you can warm up to build a con­nec­tion with, nur­ture a rela­tion­ship with, and add val­ue to their busi­ness.

So, in prep, I men­tioned ear­li­er that, you know, under­stand their busi­ness and do your home­work and prep your ques­tions. And this is what I mean: when you walk into your pitch, you need to have six to ten great ques­tions that you’re ready to ask them.

Rob:

Yeah. Because also when you do this, the eas­i­er you get clos­er to a sale. Because they open up oppor­tu­ni­ties where your ser­vices are need­ed.

Bernard:

Right. And I think that goes direct­ly to what Rob is talk­ing about. The sec­ond col­umn on this slide talks about things that you’ll need to qual­i­fy for, and we do this at SEO­Re­seller. We try to qual­i­fy our prospects for goals, or the results that they expect, what bud­get they have in mind, what their oper­at­ing bud­get is, what time­frame they had in mind, their expec­ta­tions for how fre­quent the com­mu­ni­ca­tion should be, is there a pri­ma­ry point of con­tact, what is the cur­rent busi­ness size, and what are their expec­ta­tions for the qual­i­ty of the rela­tion­ship. The more of these needs you unearth, the clos­er you get to the sale.

And this is also why it’s impor­tant you’re in their niche. Remem­ber how we talked ear­li­er about the den­tist exam­ple. If you belong in their niche, you’re less like­ly to get treat­ed as an out­sider; you’re less like­ly to get treat­ed as a stranger. Your net­works will prob­a­bly be the same, and you guys prob­a­bly attend the same event.

The next one, though, is find­ing the deci­sion-mak­er. The beau­ty of, I think, work­ing with small to medi­um sized busi­ness­es is you’ll nev­er pitch to a 6‑man pan­el. You will usu­al­ly pitch to one, two, or three peo­ple at all. But, it is so impor­tant that you make a con­nec­tion. Don’t try to make a con­nec­tion with every­one because some­times that’s just extreme­ly dif­fi­cult, and this is where being a peo­ple-pleas­er does not work. Find the deci­sion-mak­er, home in on him or her, and make sure you estab­lish that con­nec­tion.

Qual­i­fy­ing is a part of the sale, and when Rob talked about Me-Talk, this is what we mean. Qual­i­fy­ing is about ask­ing the right ques­tions. The more ques­tions you ask, the more needs you unearth, and the more air­time you give your prospect. And then, of course, fol­low up your ques­tions by prob­ing for oth­er under­ly­ing needs. By under­ly­ing needs, what I mean are the per­son­al, emo­tion­al needs that we all have when we buy things. We expect that we buy to ful­fill a cer­tain func­tion, but we also expect them to ful­fill a cer­tain emo­tion­al need, mean­ing we nev­er buy any­thing to feel crap­py, we buy things to feel good. What would make your prospect feel good? Is it achieve­ment? Is it bet­ter results? Is it achieve­ment in the eyes of their boss? But, find out what it is because that will also help you get clos­er to the sale.

[slide: Step 3 Build Desire]

Rob:

Now that you’ve prepped, now that you’ve con­nect­ed and qual­i­fied, it’s time for you to offer val­ue and build desire. Be pre­pared – bring your pitch. Drilling this down some more, be their SEO tutor, not their SEO sales­man. Prep for your­self, or be ready to lose to some­one that does.

Bernard:

Right. And that’s real­ly some­thing again we pull from Jef­frey Gitomer’s play­book. Be pre­pared for your sale, or be ready to lose to some­one that does.

Rob:

That’s why you always have to lock in and visu­al­ize your goals, so you can help them visu­al­ize theirs. Pos­i­tive ener­gy is con­ta­gious; if you are brim­ming with ener­gy and enthu­si­asm, so help them imag­ine a bet­ter per­form­ing busi­ness, and get them to embrace that vision, and you would like­ly close a sale.

Bernard:

I agree.

Rob:

Offer val­ue, solve prob­lems. So, in traf­fic, show them their site before and how you can man­age to impact that prob­lem, dash­board with ana­lyt­ics – they don’t pay for this. This is a tool that cost hun­dreds of thou­sands of dol­lars to devel­op, so they get this real-time report­ing and project man­age­ment tool at no cost.

Bernard:

Now, it’s very impor­tant guys that you know the dash­board will allow you to track your traf­fic ana­lyt­ics. It will help them col­lab­o­rate in terms of the man­age­ment of the cam­paign, it can mon­i­tor com­peti­tors, and now there’s the new CRM tool that we built for you guys where you can actu­al­ly track your prospects.

It is high­ly impor­tant that you not say this is free; it is very impor­tant that you remind them that you’re giv­ing this to them at no cost, but when you say that these things are free, it tends to dimin­ish the val­ue. So, the way you deliv­er these things also mat­ter.

The rea­son we built a traf­fic track­er, a key­word track­er, ana­lyt­ics inte­gra­tion, pre­mi­um report­ing, com­peti­tor analy­sis, is because we fol­low, you know, we prac­tice what we preach in the same way that we teach you to offer val­ue first. We are offer­ing you val­ue first, so that’s how we do it and here’s how you should do it.

Rob:

Here are some of the things we can use to con­vince them. First offer val­ue, so have your lap­top ready, pro­vide an audit right away for them, so we have the audit wid­get, we’ll talk about it more lat­er, down­load that right after this webi­nar. Next is sell­ing the invis­i­ble, and this is why you need an emo­tion­al pull. Are you going to be their expert? Are you the guide they can trust? And are you trans­par­ent enough? Are you the provider that will express the most sin­cere desire to see their busi­ness suc­ceed?

Bernard:

We all want peo­ple that will ral­ly to our cause, and we are like­ly to go with a provider that believes in our busi­ness as much as we do.

Rob:

And one of your favorites, over pow­er. Because Bernard, this tech­nique that lever­ages two bias­es, which are author­i­ty and exper­tise.

Bernard:

Ear­li­er, Rob threw a name, so I’m going to throw a name, and the author I’m going to men­tion is Daniel Kah­ne­man, and he wrote “Think­ing, Fast and Slow”. He’s a Nobel Prize win­ner for the research that he did, and in his research, he proved over and over again how pow­er­ful­ly we’re influ­enced by exper­tise and how pow­er­ful­ly were influ­enced by author­i­ty. Over­pow­er­ing is easy to learn. All you have to do is do your home­work, go to the dash­board, down­load the mate­ri­als where we teach you how the method­ol­o­gy works, mas­ter all num­bers off the top of your head – we are eas­i­ly impressed by peo­ple that are able to pull facts from thin air.

Rob:

6.5 bil­lion search­es a day.

Bernard:

100 bil­lion a month. 64% of search share is Google’s.

Rob:

90% of web sites are not opti­mized.

Bernard:

Right. 1.28 bil­lion live domains cur­rent­ly. These are exam­ples of using over­pow­er as a tech­nique.

Rob:

Learn them now. So, the next one is cre­at­ing urgency. Find things that your client can be suc­cess­ful now. This tech­nique is espe­cial­ly use­ful when a first mover advan­tage is pos­si­ble. So, what’s a first mover advan­tage? When the first page or top three posi­tions are occu­pied by unop­ti­mized web­sites, you have a first mover aban­don right.

Bernard:

So I’ll try to explain that in clear­er terms. If you do a Google search for a poten­tial client of yours, or for a lead, do a Google search and take a look at the web­sites that appear posi­tions 1, 2, and 3. If they’re meta titles and their meta descrip­tions ellipses, or end in a dot dot dot, you have a first mover advan­tage. And on search, some­times it doesn’t mat­ter that you’ve got it, doesn’t mat­ter that you’ve got all the bells and whis­tles on your web­site, what mat­ters is you get to posi­tion one first.

Rob:

And the next or the last one would be solu­tion sell­ing. So, this is find­ing a way to con­nect your busi­ness to their prob­lem. Moral high-ground note here, don’t be afraid to walk away from a sale if the rela­tion­ship between their needs and the val­ue you add are not clear. Prospects will respect your forth­right­ness and will con­tact you when their needs make them ready to buy.

Bernard:

One of the oth­er things that we like to tell peo­ple is you can’t close every­one all the time. Even for us, a one-call close is extreme­ly rare, and a one-week close is also extreme­ly rare, but what you need to do is nur­ture them because you need to be there when they’re ready to buy. So, growth hack here: nur­ture your leads – an appoint­ment is the only goal at this stage. And what you want to do is get face-to-face but when you’re no longer face-to-face, that doesn’t mean the rela­tion­ship has to end, but do not rely on them to main­tain that con­nec­tion. You main­tain that con­nec­tion because you’re the sales­man.

[slide: On-Site Audit Wid­get]

Now, in order to help you guys do that, I just want­ed to show you guys a cou­ple of screen­shots of the new fea­tures that we built for you.

This is the new on-site wid­get, and we’ve been get­ting asked by part­ners, “You know the tools that you have in the dash­board are great. Can I have it in my web­site?” Well the answer is, now you can. Now you can; go to the dash­board and go to the on-site audit wid­get, down­load it and install it on your Word­Press web­site. It’s extreme­ly easy, and if you get lost, you can dial our 1–800 num­ber or our US num­ber, and we’ll show you how to do it. But, it is extreme­ly easy.

What it does is it allows you to run the audit right from your web­site. Imag­ine, you went to a trade show, you exchanged busi­ness cards, and you ask them, “I notice you’ve got a domain on your email address, would you mind ter­ri­bly if I run an audit on your web­site?” And you just whip out your phone, your web­site is there, you run the audit, and you send it to their mail­box. What it does is it cap­tures the email and deposit it into the CRM that’s built into your dash­board, so you nev­er have to miss anoth­er prospect again, nev­er lose anoth­er poten­tial client between the cracks.

By keep­ing them in your CRM, you’re able to nur­ture your rela­tion­ship until they’re ready to buy. And yes it auto­mat­i­cal­ly sends them an email, so you don’t have to be mind­ful of, “Oh! I got­ta send them an email.” So, these are just some of the things that are new, that we built for you guys.

[slide: Step 4 Get Com­mit­ment and Close]

Now, mov­ing us for­ward is gain­ing com­mit­ment and clos­ing. When you guys try to gain a com­mit­ment, there is a con­cept in psy­chol­o­gy called prim­ing. And in sales this is what we call set­ting your prospects into a “Yes” frame of mind, and what is this, how I do gain­ing com­mit­ment is, I will ask them ques­tions that I know will delib­er­ate­ly get an affir­ma­tive answer. It doesn’t have to be a ver­ba­tim “yes”, the answer just has to be pos­i­tive or affir­ma­tive in nature. And so I’ll ask them ques­tions like “Was I able to address every­thing that was impor­tant to you?” or I might ask them, “Was I able to describe it in terms that were easy to grasp? I hope I wasn’t too tech­ni­cal.” Or I’ll ask them, “Are you feel­ing con­fi­dent after this con­ver­sa­tion?”

Rob, what is your favorite com­mit­ment ques­tion?

Rob:

Mine is real­ly sim­ple but effec­tive. So, it’s “I’m real­ly excit­ed to col­lab­o­rate with you after this con­ver­sa­tion. Do you feel the same way?”

Bernard:

Wow. And for me, I think that’s a great ques­tion. I have to say that’s not my com­mit­ment ques­tion, yours is a you know, I hate being trumped by some­one, but your ques­tion actu­al­ly trumps mine. And I think what I real­ly like about Rob’s com­mit­ment ques­tion is it focus­es on the right thing. I’m real­ly excit­ed after we’ve had this con­ver­sa­tion, and the ques­tion is, do you feel the same way. So, what he’s check­ing for is emo­tion­al sat­is­fac­tion. Yes, at the sur­face, he’s check­ing for under­stand­ing, but what he’s real­ly check­ing for is emo­tion­al sat­is­fac­tion, allow­ing him to hit a prac­ti­cal and a per­son­al need at the same time. Once you check for under­stand­ing, cre­at­ed a yes frame of mind ask two the three ques­tions with an affir­ma­tive answer, this is the time you pop the ques­tion.

And if you guys get a “no”, don’t bow your head in shame and walk out with your shoul­ders drooped. Address the fail­ure to com­mit, find out specif­i­cal­ly which por­tion in your sales process was weak. Did you not build a strong enough con­nec­tion? Did you not do your home­work? Did you not suc­cess­ful­ly build desire? And when you find out where your sales process was weak at, go back to that process and rein­force. Only then are you ready to do a close.

And so on clos­ing, there are sev­er­al tech­niques, but I will only teach you three because if you guys had four hours, we could talk about clos­ing tech­niques all day. But I will give you three that are very use­ful, and I’m going to go from most pas­sive to the most aggres­sive.

The first tech­nique I’m going to teach you guys is called an open-end­ed close. An open-end­ed close is the one that asks for the most per­mis­sion. So, you might ask them “How do you feel about this con­ver­sa­tion? Did I explain every­thing to your sat­is­fac­tion? Do you feel it’s a match?” And if the answer is yes, the way you deliv­er the open-end­ed close is, “Alright. When would you like to see the answer? When would you like to see the SLA? When would you like to receive the con­tract?” It’s an open-end­ed ques­tion that asks for the per­mis­sion for the sale.

An assertive close is dif­fer­ent. An assertive close assumes that you did a good job on the sale, and there­fore, it does not get per­mis­sion for the close, it just gives them a lim­it­ed choice. An exam­ple of this is “I’m glad that we’re both feel­ing great after this con­ver­sa­tion. Would you like me to send the con­tract to your per­son­al or work email?” Remem­ber you’re not ask­ing them, “Can I close you?” You’re ask­ing them, “Would you like me to send it to your per­son­al or work email?” So, there is a choice there, and there is a lim­it­ed lev­el of per­mis­sion, but the sales­man is assert­ing the close.

The last one is the assump­tive close where you’re prim­ing ques­tions could wind up end­ing in, “Great! I’m glad that we both feel good about each oth­er, and that I help you under­stand the val­ue of this ser­vice to your busi­ness, I’ll have the con­tract in your mail­box first thing in the morn­ing.” There are no ques­tions, it assumes the sale.

I would strong­ly rec­om­mend you use one of these three, and per­son­al­ly I would strong­ly push you guys to use the lat­ter two ver­sus an open-end­ed close, but, you know, I’m not going to impose my style on every­body.

[slide: Over­com­ing Objec­tions]

Now, mov­ing us for­ward, over­com­ing objec­tions. So, we promised that we would give you guys a cou­ple of com­mon objec­tions that that we get and that you might receive when you do these pitch­es because you will be trans­par­ent with them, you will down­load the whitepa­per, and you will give them the SLA.

And so one of the ques­tions that you’re like­ly to get asked is “Doesn’t Google pro­hib­it guest blogs?” and the right way to answer this is, the ques­tion actu­al­ly address­es a 2014 video by Matt Cutts where he said pick fork in guest blog­ging. But, strict­ly speak­ing, there is noth­ing in the Google Web­mas­ter Qual­i­ty Guide­lines that pro­hib­it acquir­ing a link from a guest blog. In fact, you guys can work with even the most expen­sive SEO providers, ridicu­lous­ly more expen­sive than us, but every­body acquires legit­i­mate back­links the same way today. And it is by hav­ing their con­tent or a back­link post­ed to them by guest blog­ging some­where, or hav­ing some­one write about their web­site by estab­lish­ing a real con­nec­tion. So, aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly speak­ing, Google does not pro­hib­it guest blogs. They are refer­ring those what 2014 video of Matt Cutts, and by know­ing that too, you dis­play exper­tise.

The next one is “Why do you need to put me on a con­tract?” This is very impor­tant to me. You’re high­ly like­ly to get asked this by some­one that’s tried SEO ser­vices with free­lancers, and that’s got­ten burned before, free­lancers tend to build only the work that they’ve done and what­not, but I think any of you that work with free­lancers will real­ize there’s not a lot of trans­paren­cy there, and there’s no guar­an­tee in the work, and you don’t know the kind of, or the qual­i­ty is sort of hit-or-miss.

A con­tract sets your clients’ expec­ta­tions for how long the deliv­ery of the ser­vice and results should be, it puts in black and white what your com­mit­ment is to your client, and what their col­lab­o­ra­tion com­mit­ments are to you, and it pre­vents buyer’s remorse. Remem­ber that when­ev­er any­body parts ways with their mon­ey, they want results today. Actu­al­ly, they might even want results yes­ter­day, but they typ­i­cal­ly want results today. A con­tract sets everyone’s expec­ta­tions in the right way, so it is a win for you, and it is a win for your prospect. When­ev­er you pitch a con­tract, don’t back down from the ques­tion because it will give them the idea that there’s some­thing sneaky going on – no, there isn’t. You need to believe, because sales is a belief sys­tem, that a con­tract puts you in a win, and your clients in a win.

Rob:

So, I’ll pick up the lad­der too. And the next one is, “Do you guar­an­tee your SEO ser­vice?” So, two parts: remem­ber that SEO process is an activ­i­ty-dri­ven prof­it, and what we guar­an­tee is that we are going to ful­fill all the SEO oppor­tu­ni­ties that you are going to pay for that month. But, the real ques­tion here, I guess, is the rank­ings – if we guar­an­tee them. Remem­ber that no one has a spe­cial arrange­ment with Google, and they actu­al­ly have announced for us to be aware of the com­pa­nies that do guar­an­tee rank­ings. So, we don’t guar­an­tee rank­ings, but we are going to guar­an­tee that we are going to com­plete and you will get what you pay for.

Bernard:

Right. And this is real­ly tak­en from Google’s play­book. They do say beware of SEO com­pa­nies that claim that they can guar­an­tee rank­ings. No one has a spe­cial arrange­ment with Google, the algo­rithm is com­plete­ly inde­pen­dent, and we absolute­ly agree.

Rob:

And the last one, I know this is your favorite.

Bernard:

I wish to answer this. This is actu­al­ly my favorite objec­tion, and I like crush­ing this. But, I will let Rob have some me-talk.

Rob:

Thank you. “Why is your pric­ing expen­sive?” This is real­ly sim­ple. If you take a look at our prices, they are just real­ly a third of the prices out there in the mar­ket, and they are very rea­son­able and com­pet­i­tive. You have to believe, though, that you are pro­vid­ing a pre­mi­um ser­vice. There’s noth­ing in what we do that a free­lancer can pro­vide, so it’s very impor­tant that you know that we pro­vide the best ser­vice and that you offer more val­ue than the oth­ers.

Bernard:

Right, that you are a pre­mi­um ser­vice provider, and it’s impor­tant that you believe that because sell­ing is a belief sys­tem. So, hope­ful­ly, we’ve helped you over­come those four hur­dles, but you know I’m see­ing some of these com­ing into the ques­tion. So, I’ll move us for­ward.

[slide: Action­able Things for You to Do Now!]

Before we part ways with you in the webi­nar, Rob and I felt real­ly strong­ly that our time and your time would be best spent if we left you with a cou­ple of assign­ments and a cou­ple of things to do, action­able things for you to do right now.

So, as soon as the webi­nar is done, before you give us a call or shoot us an email, do some research. Go to Google and join niche-relat­ed orga­ni­za­tions in your area, join the local Cham­ber of Com­merce in your area, find the local busi­ness asso­ci­a­tions that are of inter­est to you, join them. The oth­er one is if you already have exist­ing clients, offer dis­counts to your exist­ing clients. That way, for every refer­ral they send you, this allows you to expo­nen­tial­ly increase the size of your net­work and your poten­tial reach. If we’re talk­ing about cast­ing a wide net, this is the right way to cast a wide net.

Rob:

And the next one is attend or host dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing event or sem­i­nar. So, these should be includ­ed into your mar­ket­ing bud­get. Our suc­cess­ful part­ners do these activ­i­ties reg­u­lar­ly. This shows your exper­tise; don’t just rely on Rob’s star pow­er. Be your own expert, learn every­thing, down­load them now.

The next one is install the free site audit plug-in and be pre­pared. Like what we’ve been preach­ing on to this webi­nar, the site audit plu­g­in is ready, take advan­tage of it right now.

Bernard:

Imag­ine you walk­ing up to some­one with your web­site pre-loaded on your phone, you typ­ing their URL and send­ing them an audit into their mail­box in a cou­ple of min­utes. It makes you look incred­i­bly savvy and incred­i­bly techy. It lever­ages author­i­ty and exper­tise.

[slide: Part­ner CRM]

Now just as a reminder again, a cou­ple of cool fea­tures that we devel­oped specif­i­cal­ly for you guys and in time for this webi­nar: an all-in-one plat­form for acquir­ing, clos­ing, and ser­vic­ing. Your white label dash­board has a CRM or a lead track­er. That way, you nev­er lose anoth­er prospect or you nev­er let a prospect fall between the cracks ever again. On-site SEO wid­get is ready for you to inte­grate into your Word­Press web­site. The moment you send the audit, those prospects imme­di­ate­ly get dropped into your CRM, track your leads, man­age your cus­tomers, and show the results of your cam­paigns in one easy-to-use dash­board.

[slide: On-Site Audit Wid­get]

So, with that, this is the on-site wid­get, the email tem­plate, and the CRM where we drop them. Again, take advan­tage of it, nur­ture your rela­tion­ships, and nev­er lose anoth­er prospect again. Now it’s time to take a cou­ple of your ques­tions, and I know that Rob and I took up some time, and because sales is fun to dis­cuss, but some of the ques­tions that have come in are the fol­low­ing.

[slide: White Label Dash­board Train­ing]

Before we get to the ques­tions, just a cou­ple of reminders, on August, we’re going to do train­ing on the lat­est fea­tures of your white label dash­board, includ­ing how to use the part­ner CRM, how to inte­grate the site audit wid­get onto your web­site, and how to use the pro­pos­al builder. So, please join us again next month, and we’ll keep an eye out for the invi­ta­tion that we will prob­a­bly send out next week. So, let’s go to the Q&A por­tion of this con­ver­sa­tion.

And one the ques­tions that we got on the chat box was “How do I pitch local SEO to a busi­ness that has mul­ti­ple loca­tions?” The answer to this is easy. I’m going to try to not get too tech­ni­cal about this, but it is pos­si­ble to get busi­ness­es to rank for mul­ti­ple loca­tions, espe­cial­ly if they have phys­i­cal loca­tions in their area. You guys are actu­al­ly talk­ing to the right guys. The num­ber one auto deal­er­ship in the Unit­ed States was a cam­paign that was worked by us with one of our agency part­ners, and it’s doable.

Take for exam­ple, if it was a Ford deal­er­ship with mul­ti­ple loca­tions, you can opti­mize each dealership’s page or each dealership’s web­site inde­pen­dent­ly. You can cre­ate Google My Busi­ness pro­files for them. What mat­ters is that the names, address­es, and phone num­bers are unique.

The next ques­tion that we got from you guys is “What should be an aver­age price for the ser­vice per month?” And Rob, I think I’ll let you take that.

Rob:

Yeah. If you go to our dash­board and see our prices, you can actu­al­ly dou­ble, or 200 to 300 per­cent, you can mark those.

Bernard:

So, about dou­ble to triple our rates will make you very com­pet­i­tive. Actu­al­ly, dou­ble our rates makes it extreme­ly com­pet­i­tive, because that is below retail mar­ket rates for Pre­mi­um SEO ser­vices.

The next one is “Will you show us how to do a step-by-step prospect research, not just an overview but deep­er under­stand­ing for us that are new to this indus­try but need to be suc­cess­ful in mar­ket­ing SEO and web design?” So, this one’s a lit­tle dif­fi­cult to answer. The answer is. Well, I guess I’ll leave it to you guys, do you want this in a for­mat of a webi­nar or do you guys want it as a per­son­al dis­cus­sion? If you guys want it as a per­son­al dis­cus­sion, there are our phone num­bers, reach out to us, and call us, and yes, we can teach you this step-by-step. And it’s not a long and dif­fi­cult process; it’s fair­ly easy, but if you want to learn this in mass or, I guess, as a group of our cus­tomers, let us know by send­ing us an email to info@seoreseller.com that you would like a webi­nar on a step-by-step process on prospect research.

The next one is “Is there a lim­it to the num­ber of cita­tions you can build for a web­site?” And Rob, is there a lim­it?

Rob:

None. Actu­al­ly, your only lim­it would be the list­ings that’s present or avail­able out there.

Bernard:

It real­ly just depends on the avail­abil­i­ty of local resources and hyper­local resources in your area, but you know, I wish I could say that our research proved that there was a mag­ic num­ber to hit in terms of the opti­mum num­ber of list­ings you have. But, the real­i­ty is, there isn’t. It just looks like the more, the mer­ri­er, and it blends well with links.

That is, unfor­tu­nate­ly, all the time we’ve got, and we’re get­ting the wrap-up sign here, so I hope you guys enjoyed this Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar on How to Sell Local SEO. Rob?

Rob:

I had fun.

Rob:

Yeah, so did I. This is a real­ly fun run, and I hope you join us again on our next webi­nar. Thank you very much for spend­ing the time with us, and talk to you guys soon.

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