Boost Your Business!

Ace Your Next Sales Pitch Webi­nar

For your con­ve­nience, we tran­scribed our Boost Your Busi­ness: Ace Your Next Sales Pitch webi­nar below.

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Webinar Transcript

[Down­load­able ver­sion of this tran­script, the pre­sen­ta­tion deck and oth­er mate­ri­als are also avail­able in the Dash­board Resource Cen­ter]

Bernard:

Hel­lo every­one and wel­come back to the Boost Your Busi­ness series with SEO­Re­seller and for this webi­nar we’re doing Ace Your Next Sales Pitch. Again, I’m Bernard San Juan. I’m the hand­some guy on the left and with me today is Will.

{slide: Meet Our Pan­elists}

So Will has been our busi­ness devel­op­er for 3 years and I’ll let him do his own intro.

William:

Alright, hi guys. Yeah three years with SEO­Re­seller, but I’ve been work­ing for about 8 years in the web indus­try, been help­ing peo­ple grow their busi­ness­es as well. So we are very much look­ing for­ward to teach­ing you guys all about how to make your sales pitch.

Bernard:

It’s very time­ly because we actu­al­ly did recent­ly do our own sales work­shop. Now before I jump into the meat of this con­ver­sa­tion I want­ed to start off by say­ing every­one is free to ask a ques­tion at any point in time dur­ing the webi­nar and right before I go into the webi­nar top­ics, I will do two shame­less plugs. And believe me, you’ll love to see these.

{slide: Recent Dash­board Fea­ture}

So the first one is, I’d like to remind every­body that we con­stant­ly update the con­tent in our resource cen­ter and these are our brand­able doc­u­ments, our client man­age­ment mate­r­i­al, our sales mate­ri­als, sam­ple con­tracts and sam­ple SLAs. We strong­ly rec­om­mend that you go in there and review them con­stant­ly plus these mate­ri­als can be used to train your own in house staff as well and if you don’t have a lot of sub­ject mat­ter knowl­edge, this is the best place to learn them.

{slide: Com­ing this month}

The next one which is some­thing I’m real­ly excit­ed about is our mock­up builder and our pro­pos­al cre­ator, so right after this webi­nar we’re launch­ing this fea­ture in your Dash­board. What the mock­up builder does is it allows you to design a web­site from pre-built tem­plates that we’ve built into the sys­tem. Their clas­si­fied by themes and their built from thou­sands of pre­mi­um web designs. It allows you to take into account what­ev­er your client told you they want­ed to see in their site and design it. You don’t need pro­fes­sion­al help. It’s drag and drop, it’s what you see is what you get and it’s awe­some. It’s very easy. Once you’ve made the mock­up you’re actu­al­ly able to inte­grate it into a pro­pos­al cre­ator. And what the pro­pos­al cre­ator does it inte­grates an SLA, a con­tract, an intake form and a pre­sen­ta­tion of the mock­up all in one go. And you can do all of this in a mat­ter of min­utes. Easy does it. Now one of the best parts of this, is that we built it specif­i­cal­ly for our Local Web Design projects and that’s the prod­uct that we’re sell­ing at $499

{slide: Dis­cus­sion Out­line}

So on this webi­nar we want to empow­er you with tools, tips and tech­niques, that’ll help you pitch con­fi­dent­ly and effec­tive­ly and what we want to do is talk to you about prep­ping for the pitch and that is what we call Lay­ing the Ground­work. And lay­ing the ground­work has to do with over­com­ing the real­i­ty of small­ness by think­ing big and look­ing big. Tools for you to cre­ate desire and then of course at the end of this ses­sion we’re going to go through a QA ses­sion.

{slide: Lay The Ground­work}

Alright, so let’s talk about Lay­ing the Ground­work.

William:

And lay­ing the ground­work is all about being pre­pared.

{slide: Things to know by heart}

Prepa­ra­tion is key when you’re deal­ing with your clients and let me be hon­est with you. If you’re not pre­pared for it and you haven’t done your research your client will.

Bernard:

So I absolute­ly agree. Its Google is a pow­er­ful tool. It’s, Google is your ora­cle. It’s also their ora­cle if you haven’t Googled them, they’ve Googled you. But more impor­tant than that if you have not done your research on them, your com­peti­tors have. So here’s an easy tip for you to walk into that sales pitch con­fi­dent­ly. You have to walk in there feel­ing like an expert and being an expert is eas­i­er than you think. In order to, in order for you to be able to walk in there with some amount of exper­tise, know your lit­tle bits and bytes of data. The ones that you know by heart. So, take for exam­ple, I’ll let William take this away.

William:

So 91% of your traf­fic goes to page one of Google, and that’s on the serps. And 29% of the clicks on the first posi­tion.

Bernard:

And there’s more to it than that. Some of the oth­er bits and bytes of data that we like to tell peo­ple to remem­ber is 74% of click through is on results 1 to 10, 23% of peo­ple will click SEM PPC ads and only 3 out of 100 peo­ple will go past page 10. Now because we’re talk­ing to you guys and you guys ser­vice agen­cies, here’s a great bit of data that I think you all should know by heart. Did you know 28 and a half mil­lion small busi­ness­es exist in the Unit­ed States alone. 60% of those busi­ness­es don’t have web­sites. So 60% of those busi­ness­es don’t have web­sites. That’s rough­ly about 17, 18 mil­lion oppor­tu­ni­ties for you. 41% of them open­ly say that they plan to build a site and 28% of them already have their domains.

Now here’s the fun­ny thing. Even though Godad­dy com­mis­sioned red­shift research to exe­cute this, this research in the US, in the US mar­ket. Did you know that this is also true, almost glob­al­ly? That there are 60%. That 60% of all small busi­ness­es glob­al­ly don’t’ have web­sites. This is a great piece of infor­ma­tion for you to know off the top of your head all the time and it cre­ates instant exper­tise image for you.

{slide: Think Big, Look Big}

Now, let’s talk about you look­ing big. You over­com­ing the real­i­ty of small­ness. Now you guys remem­ber the con­ver­sa­tion that we had about part­ner 1, part­ner 2 and part­ner 3, right? These are the clients that we helped grow into enor­mous recur­ring month­ly rev­enues and they all start­ed out as one man shows. They’re like you guys every­body that’s lis­ten­ing to this webi­nar that is a free­lancer or is work­ing a job and is doing this moon­light­ing or you know is think­ing about set­ting up their own bou­tique agency. This is you guys. They were you guys two, three, years ago. They all start­ed out as one man shows. Now one of the things that helped them over­come the real­i­ty of small­ness is that all three part­ners used the Dash­board reli­gious­ly. They edu­cat­ed their clients on how to use the Dash­board, how to be depen­dent on it how to access it from a mobile phone from a desk­top they book­marked it. Every­thing. So, with them, the Dash­board helped them scale up because they could man­aged their projects from there, they can gen­er­ate their pro­pos­als from there and so on and so forth. So, here’s why you use the Dash­board.

{slide: Think Big, Look Big}

So the Dash­board helps you cre­ate a great impres­sion.

William:

An impres­sion is real­ly what’s key here. It comes off at the start and the best way to do that is by remem­ber­ing that’s what we’re’ here for. You know, we have the pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy. We’re allow­ing you to be able to show your results to them. Now we also have a method­ol­o­gy that works and that oth­er clients can attest to. Now you can also share the resources to han­dle your cam­paign. That’s all the, that’s pret­ty much all the files we have in the resource cen­ter.

Bernard:

One of the biggest chal­lenges you guys will have to over­come is that a lot of you will start out like our Pow­er­house Agen­cies as one man shows and nobody wants to come across as you know, I’m a free­lancer, I’m a one man show. Nobody wants to come off as that. Every­body wants to come off as big. Because then they know you’re not fly by night, that you’ve got a rep­u­ta­tion, that you’ve got a proven method­ol­o­gy.

So the Dash­board allows you to look like you have invest­ed in pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy. It shows them that you were invest­ed into this indus­try. More than that you can claim that you got a method­ol­o­gy that oth­er clients can attest to. And if you guys need help. Inside our method­ol­o­gy explain­er are end client tes­ti­mo­ni­als to how the method­ol­o­gy worked for them. Then of course that you have the resources to han­dle their cam­paign.

{slide: Think Big, Look Big}

So, just to give you guys an illus­tra­tion of how the image of large­ness helps you over­come the real­i­ty of small­ness. Way back in 2011 we ran a $200 remar­ket­ing cam­paign and in 2011 nobody knew what remar­ket­ing was. Nobody. Nobody knew that ads could algo­rith­mi­cal­ly fol­low you around based on your per­son­al pref­er­ence. And when we ran the ad, when we ran the remar­ket­ing cam­paign our ads start­ed appear­ing to cer­tain users every­where, every­where. And these peo­ple, these prospects, these leads thought we spent mil­lions. It didn’t mat­ter that we spent $200 on a remar­ket­ing cam­paign. In their minds since we were every­where, we must’ve spent mil­lions on that cam­paign. And if we were spend­ing that much, we must’ve been big. The result was the inter­est to part­ner with SEO­Re­seller increased by a fac­tor of 8 to 10 that month. It was amaz­ing. And this is sim­i­lar to what the Dash­board can do for you. It can look. It can make you look like you are an estab­lished, invest­ed, play­er in the indus­try.

{slide: Lever­age the tech­nol­o­gy}

William:

Now like we men­tioned ear­li­er. It’s all about lever­ag­ing and lean­ing on the tech­nol­o­gy. I know we could have been giv­ing you tips on pret­ty much how to work with what you’ve got. But that’s real­ly why we’re here. We want to help and even if it’s your first time, don’t wor­ry about it. Because that’s exact­ly what we want to show you. The very first thing your end client gets to see and what you should pret­ty much pro­pose for is the White Label Dash­board. It helps you to cre­ate that good impres­sion and also allow you to high­light some capa­bil­i­ties their will­ing to fill out mov­ing for­ward. So to set up your White Label Dash­board you can upload your com­pa­ny logo, you can set your col­or scheme, about two of them, you can cus­tomize the link that the clients use and then you can put that with­in the White Label Dash­board. Con­fig­ure your sub domain Dash­board and then add your White Label Dash­board title.

Bernard:

Now, once you’ve done that that’s only half the bat­tle. Remem­ber that once you set up your White Label Dash­board, you still have to show the client Dash­board what they’re going to see.

{slide: Lever­age the tech­nol­o­gy}

And this is how you access the demo site and remem­ber, once you, once you set up the White Label Dash­board you’ve got your demo account live. Now in the event you haven’t ful­ly set it up by mask­ing it on your, inside your domain or your name reg­is­trar there is a URL that you can access that’s lit­er­al­ly slash and then our com­pa­nies name. When you go to access hub and login as demo@demo.com and then the pass­word is demo, you’re going to see a cam­paign that looks like as if it were live. It’s got rank­ings, it’s got traf­fic, it’s got data. It allows you to show them exact­ly what the expe­ri­ence with you will be like.

And this is some­thing that we’ll dis­cuss mov­ing for­ward because you have to be able to help them imag­ine what their future suc­cess with you will be like. So the Dash­board allows you to do that. It allows you to show them, it allows you to walk them through a demo account that shows them vivid­ly what kind of expe­ri­ence they’ll have with you.

{slide: Use the method­ol­o­gy}

Now, going back to the webi­nar from last month. We always said, lean on us for the method­ol­o­gy. Lean on us for the tech­nol­o­gy and we try our best to get you guys as edu­cat­ed as we can on how our method­ol­o­gy works. Now, there’s one, there’s one rea­son why we’re still here, and why we’re a strong play­er in the indus­try. The method­ol­o­gy works. We rank our cam­paigns. We rank our clients. We rank the end-clients. Every­body that works with us. We will actu­al­ly lose sleep if our cam­paigns refuse to per­form. So to attest to this we’ve put in some white label, you know, we pro­tect the iden­ti­ty of the cus­tomers and our part­ner agen­cies and we put in some tes­ti­mo­ni­als inside our method­ol­o­gy explain­ers and you guys can use this.

So it’s impor­tant that you under­stand how the method­ol­o­gy works. You don’t need to rein­vent the wheel. Lean on us for the method­ol­o­gy. But take our word for it when we say that by doing this hun­dreds and hun­dreds and hun­dreds of times each month, we found a for­mu­la that works.

{slide: You have an entire team to back you up}

William:

Not only that, what comes with the method­ol­o­gy are, it’s team, it’s an entire team that’s here to help you. Every­body here at some point has learned SEO, has learned Web Design, has learned every­thing about the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing spec­trum. Out­side and once they’ve come in, they’re able to under­stand what we’ve gone through and all of the research that we put in every month. The expe­ri­ence of every end client you guys bring for­ward to us becomes theirs as well. And what we want to do is share that knowl­edge and we have the team to help you do that. So when we say we have about 130 ‑140 peo­ple ready to help you, that’s the same thing and the very same thing you can say to your clients as well. That’s your team. That’s us and that’s the team that will help you guys too.

Bernard:

Now, pre­vi­ous­ly on Boost Your Busi­ness we told you that we flew those Pow­er­house Agen­cies part­ners over to the Philip­pines and we did. Every time they walk into the office, their floored at how large it is. Because, you know, when it start­ed off it was one, two, three, four, five cam­paigns. And a few months down the road they’re prob­a­bly run­ning around 30 – 50 projects with us at any on any giv­en month. It’s hard to imag­ine how much intri­cate work and how many peo­ple have to col­lab­o­rate in order to make those projects suc­cess­ful and when­ev­er they walk into the office, they’re floored. And this is where they appre­ci­ate all the work that goes into mak­ing these projects suc­cess­ful.

Remem­ber, even though you’re start­ing off, even though you’re a one man show and you have to face down the real­i­ty of small­ness, you have a team of 131 dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing pro­fes­sion­als back­ing you up. You’re not alone. You have this whole team. We work for you at SEO­Re­seller.

{slide: Get to know your prospects}

So, let’s talk about qual­i­fy­ing, and this is a very impor­tant phase of the sales process.

William:

And like I, like we were say­ing ear­li­er. It’s all about the prep. So if you’re not research­ing your clients, your com­peti­tors are. And let’s say you’ve inter­act­ed for the first time with your client if you didn’t do your research, they prob­a­bly did the research for you already and that doesn’t make you look good. So you got to show gen­uine inter­est as well by under­stand­ing their prob­lems. Now, when you present to them and once if you’ve done your research and you’re able to pro­vide the data, what hap­pens next is that you have to influ­ence to talk at least 50% of the time. That shows you have con­trol of the con­ver­sa­tion.

Bernard:

Now, at the risk of being a lit­tle inap­pro­pri­ate I always like to com­pare, when­ev­er I do sales train­ing, I like to com­pare sell­ing to dat­ing. Because they are very sim­i­lar. It’s about you get­ting to know some­one and that’s pre­cise­ly what dat­ing is. And if you, and you always prep for a date, but more than that, when you’re on the actu­al date, you allow who­ev­er you’re with to take at least half the band­width. The same is true on a pitch. You don’t learn any­thing when you’re mouth, when your mouth is open. You learn some­thing when you’re lis­ten­ing. Make sure that at least half the time you’re ask­ing ques­tions. Because that pitch is about you unearthing busi­ness require­ments, mar­ket­ing needs and their busi­ness goals. This is what you want to find out.

Now the rea­son you want to run an audit inside the sys­tem is because the audit is designed to keep the con­ver­sa­tion focused on the client. Remem­ber you’re going to have to have 45 min­utes to 60 min­utes max inside the sales pitch. Make sure you make the most of it and that you use the time wise­ly by focus­ing on your prospects busi­ness. Their mar­ket­ing and their goals.

{slide: Sam­ple Ques­tions to Ask}

So here are a cou­ple of sam­ple ques­tions to ask. Will, what do guys ask our part­ners?

William:

Well, here’s a, here’s a few of them that we’ve col­lect­ed and then it’s sup­posed to lead to two stronger ques­tions, but you can’t get to the last two if you have not been able to ask the rest of these. So the first thing we ask is what kind of busi­ness and what ser­vices do you offer your clients? So Are you a BtoB or are you a BtoC? Are you also in the ser­vices sec­tor? Like what are the three major prob­lems that you’re expe­ri­enc­ing in your busi­ness. And what are the areas you’d like to see improve­ment with­in your busi­ness? I mean what are the things that you felt the whole, I mean last year, what were the things that you’ve encoun­tered that your busi­ness was suf­fer­ing from. Now, next to that we asked them after, ok, do you know what you’ve been expe­ri­enc­ing? Have you guys fig­ured out a way to fix it? Do you have any solu­tions? Do you have an in-house expert advis­ing you in any of that? Once you’ve got­ten all those ques­tions out of the way than you can ask them, so, do you have a time-frame? Do you have a time-frame to see how long it will take to get these all worked out? And if you do, how much do you feel it’s going to take for that to hap­pen?

Bernard:

So, one of the things I want to remind you guys, is all the ques­tions are not made equal. Not all ques­tions are made equal. Some ques­tions allow you to zero in on a per­fect prospect. And for us these are real­ly three things. Have they done it before? And did they have a pre­vi­ous provider? Do they have a time-frame and do they have a work­ing bud­get? Pret­ty much for us an answer, a pos­i­tive answer to these three ques­tions, gives us a stronger dri­ve to close those poten­tial prospects, because they have an exist­ing need. And you know that you’re offer­ing a ser­vice that works and you know that you’re offer­ing a ser­vice that’s trans­par­ent. You should do what­ev­er it takes to close that sale. You will do that lead, that prospect a dis­ser­vice by not clos­ing them to the best of your abil­i­ty if they’re needs exist.

{slide: Cre­ate Desire}

William:

The next step is cre­at­ing desire. Now it’s all about telling a sto­ry and if you told the sto­ry right, every­body will under­stand what the moral was, or at least what les­son you’re try­ing to put up. So you got to help them visu­al­ize their future suc­cess with you. The more vivid, the clear­er it is, the vision, the more like­ly you’re going to close.

Bernard:

Agreed, and this is why we ask you guys to make sure that you set up your Dash­board like our three suc­cess­ful Pow­er­house Agency part­ners. Because they had the abil­i­ty to walk some­body through a demo account and show them exact­ly the kind of expe­ri­ence that they would have. Now, when it comes to cre­at­ing desire, it’s all about you break­ing the stranger’s bar­ri­er. You try­ing to be a friend and you mak­ing an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion.

{slide: Use the Audit}

You don’t nec­es­sar­i­ly need to Maven your way through the pitch in order to win the sale. So, get to know your clients by know­ing their busi­ness ahead of time. And this is where the Dash­board again is a tool that helps you. Right, smack, dab in the mid­dle of your Dash­board is a field where you’re allowed to run an audit. And by typ­ing the URL and press­ing run it allows you to cre­ate an auto­mat­ed report. It lit­er­al­ly takes a minute in order for you to gen­er­ate this and what it does for you is instant research. Now, there’s a right way to use the audit and there’s a wrong way to use the audit. So here’s a pro tip. When, in that 45 – 60 min­utes dis­close just enough infor­ma­tion for you to peak their inter­est. So I’ll repeat that. Dis­close just enough infor­ma­tion for you to peak their inter­est. The goal of the audit is not for you to run a con­ver­sa­tion that defines each one. This is what’s pager­ank, this is what mal­ware is, here’s your IP address, here’s what’s moz-rank is, here’s what page author­i­ty is. No, all it’s there for, is for you to cre­ate inter­est, encour­age them to ask more ques­tions and then go to you for more fre­quent com­mu­ni­ca­tion so you have an oppor­tu­ni­ty to address their ques­tions. It also keep you hon­est by focus­ing the con­ver­sa­tion of that pitch entire­ly about them. So, the point is to keep the con­ver­sa­tion about them and not you.

{slide: Clos­ing Rate}

So, just to prove our point and to illus­trate our point we want­ed to pull up a cou­ple of sta­tis­tics and per­son­al­ly. I found these sta­tis­tics very sur­pris­ing. These are Feb­ru­ary per­for­mances for some of our part­ners. These are not by the way nec­es­sar­i­ly the same part­ners we talked about in the pre­vi­ous webi­nar. These are 3 part­ners and two of these part­ners reli­gious­ly use the auto­mat­ed audit. But part­ner 3 actu­al­ly has in-house experts that run their own man­u­al in-depth audits. So, let’s go to part­ner one. Part­ner one actu­al­ly cre­at­ed six­ty pro­pos­als from their Dash­board and they engaged 21 new clients. They enrolled 21 new accounts with us this month. That gives them a 35% 30 day close rate.

Now, the rea­son I’m say­ing 30 day close rate is, in the pre­vi­ous webi­nar I said that SEO, you know, that it takes time, it takes a lot of con­sid­er­a­tion, not every­body knows what it is. Remem­ber 60% of small busi­ness­es don’t even own web­sites. So their much, even less going to know about what SEO is. And so it takes 30 – 90 days in order for you to close a prospect. But part­ner one run­ning 60 pro­pos­als added 21 new cam­paigns into his port­fo­lio. Giv­ing him a 35% 30 day close rate. That’s tremen­dous. I didn’t even expect that data when I ran it.

Now part­ner 2, same time peri­od, Feb­ru­ary last month ran 24 pro­pos­als through the sys­tem and added 6 of those clients into his port­fo­lio this month, giv­ing them a 25% 30 day close rate. Also, very impres­sive because some of those 24 are still very like­ly going to close at some point dur­ing the next 60 to 90 days.

Now let’s talk about part­ner 3 in con­trast. Part­ner 3 cre­at­ed 24 pro­pos­als. They cre­at­ed 24 pro­pos­als in-house using their own experts and the rea­son we know the num­ber of pro­pos­als they do is because we cross check their pro­pos­als. One of the things that is good about part­ner­ing with agen­cies is, you’re open to dis­cuss your method­olo­gies and we teach our part­ners very well to not over-promise some­thing that our method­ol­o­gy can­not deliv­er. So we see every pro­pos­al that’s done. Hav­ing gen­er­at­ed 24 pro­pos­als they added 2 clients onto their port­fo­lio giv­ing them only an 8.5 30 day close rate.

Now, there’s a very sci­en­tif­ic rea­son behind this and this is what we like to call the Can­dy Store anal­o­gy and you guys prob­a­bly heard it via the term analy­sis paral­y­sis. When you give some­one too much infor­ma­tion, you drown them in infor­ma­tion. This is not the pur­pose of the audit. The pur­pose of the audit is to pique their curios­i­ty, encour­age them to ask ques­tions down the line and then start more con­ver­sa­tions with you. Whether through a 30, 60, 90 day close. That’s all it’s meant to do. It’s not meant to drown them in info. It’s meant to make them more curi­ous. More inter­est­ed.

{slide: Offer Val­ue}

William:

Now, at that point you’re allowed to and you’re able to offer val­ue. So here’s anoth­er pro tech­nique about how to offer val­ue. Like we said ear­li­er, you got to lean and you’ve got to lever­age the tech­nol­o­gy. We spent over $100 000 cre­at­ing this pro­pri­etary Dash­board. Here’s the truth. Your clients, they may, they’ve prob­a­bly nev­er seen a Dash­board before ever. All they’ve prob­a­bly seen are excel reports, all they’ve got were con­ver­sa­tions or emails or promis­es or guar­an­tees, Google docs. That’s, that’s all they’re ever going to see.

Now that’s the dif­fer­ence between a client who’s nev­er seen any tech­nol­o­gy like that before, so once you’re show­ing them and this all about again think­ing big and look­ing big. Once they see the Dash­board, they’ll real­ize, wow look at this. This is, this is some­thing I’ve not seen before, so I guess I have the same poten­tial as this per­son? The same per­son you’re show­ing me on this demo account? Well yes of course. But, so, if you need help with the Dash­board and you feel if you have not seen it before, don’t wor­ry, because all you have to do is, you can pret­ty much con­tact your project man­ag­er. It might even be me. Rarely Bernard but then there will be project man­agers assigned to your account so feel free to call them up. And I guess not the only thing; we also have sales tools as well.

Bernard:

Pro tip. Offer val­ue first. This is one of the most sacred dog­mas to sell­ing. It’s about offer­ing val­ue first. And offer­ing val­ue first means you invest­ing time, effort, poten­tial­ly even mon­ey and resources to clos­ing a prospect. It’s always appre­ci­at­ed. It’s always appre­ci­at­ed. Now, we under­stand that this is a require­ment in order for you to do a suc­cess­ful close and this is why we give you a lot of these mate­ri­als for free. You don’t need to tell your prospect that these things are free, by the way.

But remem­ber that the Dash­board costs hun­dreds of thou­sands of dol­lars to devel­op and it’s there for, it’s there for you to use. You will have used your pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy to show them what their expe­ri­ence with you will be like. You will have done your research about them tak­ing up your time, your resources and then you will all, you will also be able to pro­vide them with White Papers that edu­cate them on the method­ol­o­gy you’re about to intro­duce them to. That’s all offer­ing val­ue first. They have not engaged with you yet at this point and yet here you are, invest­ing time, mon­ey and effort in order to help them grow their busi­ness. That speaks tremen­dous­ly about what you would be like as a provider.

{slide: Offer Val­ue}

Now, the oth­er ways to offer val­ue is to prove your exper­tise, right. This is where we said, you know, pro­vide them with case stud­ies, give them the method­ol­o­gy explain­er that has the end client tes­ti­mo­ni­als. Pro­vide them with the White Papers and the Guides because these allow you to lever­age cog­ni­tive bias called Author­i­ty Bias. Now, what do we mean? Remem­ber that you’ve already at this point, you’ve already set up your Dash­board, you’ve already gen­er­at­ed the audit. At the point that you exe­cute the audit or have the con­ver­sa­tion with them in the pitch, let them know that you will hand them edu­ca­tion­al mate­r­i­al about what you’ve just dis­cussed that will answer most of their ques­tions. In real­i­ty as they go through the mate­r­i­al they will become more curi­ous. They will find more ques­tions and you know, they will prob­a­bly have some friends in the indus­try that they can ask. It will raise more ques­tions and cre­ate more oppor­tu­ni­ties for you to engage them.

{slide: Cre­ate Desire}

William:

So, it’s again, now after offer­ing your val­ue, you need to be able to cre­ate that desire. They’ve seen every­thing. They now know that you’ve done your research. They know the val­ue. Wow all of this is free and I’m get­ting all this infor­ma­tion. I just have so many ques­tions. I, I, I’m so inter­est­ed in what you’re doing. I and now I believe that you’re going to help me. So, but, instead of just pro­mot­ing your prod­uct or focus­ing on just one prod­uct, or ser­vice or, an offer­ing, you have to now focus on your client’s pain points. And you have to address them with the ser­vice offer­ings.

So if you can see these two cir­cles here the client needs and the ser­vice offer­ings. The area or the space between that is the area of rel­e­vance. Now, like we said ear­li­er, when you do your prep, you got to real­ly only focus on like the site audit, you got to only focus only on cer­tain things. Don’t define the whole thing and that’s real­ly what defines that area is, just what they need to focus on as well. Iden­ti­fy their needs; find out which ser­vices are matched with the prob­lems of your client.

Bernard:

Now, remem­ber we train our dig­i­tal mar­keters and our project man­agers, one of the things we try to teach them, we try to teach them as many SEO met­rics as we can. Because, you know, we want them to be top notch, spear head, aces. We want them to be at the top 10% of the indus­try. But in spite of the fact that we teach them that we also let them lis­ten to the record­ings of the more tenured employ­ees, of the more tenured sales­peo­ple.

One of the fun­ny obser­va­tions that they make dur­ing, dur­ing this part of their train­ing is that there is vir­tu­al­ly no SEO con­ver­sa­tion hap­pen­ing on any of those pitch con­ver­sa­tions. None at all. Most of it is about here’s old we are, how old is your com­pa­ny. Here’s what we were try­ing to do 2 years ago. Where are you guys at right now. What are you guys try­ing to achieve with your SEO, because when it was us, this is what we were try­ing to achieve. Are you, where are you from in, in the Unit­ed States. So these are, these are great ques­tions to ask and what you see is that, you know, all sales pitch­es are the same. It doesn’t’ mat­ter if you’re sell­ing SEO or floor­ing or what­ev­er it is.

All sales, the sales process is the same. It’s all about you fig­ur­ing out their needs and it’s all about meet­ing the need with your ser­vice. So case in point. We try to teach our guys hun­dreds of SEO met­rics. We don’t expect them to get into a 4 hour con­ver­sa­tion to edu­cate our clients about it. We expect them to only talk about the met­rics that the clients can lever­age to dri­ve results. And this is pre­cise­ly what we mean when we say stay­ing with­in the area of rel­e­vance. Now, here’s a hint. Beside that report is a tool you can use to iden­ti­fy areas that need improve­ment. Find out are these areas of improve­ment, are what is impor­tant to them, or do they have oth­er impor­tant busi­ness require­ments, oth­er impor­tant busi­ness growths.

William:

Just to add as well. At some point your client may actu­al­ly tell you what the prob­lem is at the start. That gives you a clue about whether you should focus on it or not. Some peo­ple may have advised them before. But know­ing where you’re client’s at and is going back to stay­ing, I should know their sto­ry and from there you can take it all the way. The site audit helps you iden­ti­fy if that prob­lem is real. I just want­ed to add.

{slide: Buy­ing Cri­te­ria}

Bernard:

Now, since we’ve gone through prep­ping and we’ve gone through build­ing desire and you try­ing to break through being a stranger and try­ing to become a friend, estab­lish­ing an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion. Let’s talk about the buy­ing cri­te­ria because at this point you’re real­ly only halfway there. If you don’t take the time to under­stand your client. If you don’t try to take the time to under­stand about your prospect or lead, who­ev­er it is you’re pitch­ing to, you’re not going to be able to match your ser­vice offer­ing despite the tech­nol­o­gy that we put behind you. In order to con­clude it to a close.

There’s cer­tain require­ments in order for you to do a close and the first one is estab­lish­ing an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion. And this one we can vouch for. We have cam­paigns, projects, inside, inside our port­fo­lio that are old­er than me and I’m on my fifth year at SEO­Re­seller. So we have cam­paigns that are run­ning old­er than me and that speaks a lot about the kind of rela­tion­ships that we build. The oth­er is of course we wouldn’t have been able to keep those cam­paigns for that long if we weren’t able to show results. Now, grant­ed that we always teach every agency that wants to become a pow­er­house, don’t guar­an­tee results because, you know, no rep­utable SEO agency guar­an­tees results. If they do, you real­ly need to be skep­ti­cal. But if we couldn’t show results, we would feel bad about tak­ing someone’s mon­ey and that’s not the way we oper­ate. It’s Impor­tant for us that we dri­ve results. The method­ol­o­gy works. I can’t even say it enough in this con­ver­sa­tion. The method­ol­o­gy works. This is why we have been here 6 years, 4 major pen­guins, 25 pan­das lat­er.

Now, the oth­er is of course, pro­vid­ing them con­sis­tent and pre­dictable expe­ri­ences and now I like to com­pare this to is, expe­ri­ences at McDon­alds. In a book called Sell­ing the Invis­i­ble, it teach­es you to sell or to iden­ti­fy the dif­fer­ence between what is your prod­uct and what is your com­mod­i­ty. And in real­i­ty here our com­mod­i­ty is rank­ings. The com­mod­i­ty is rank­ings. But the prod­uct is the expe­ri­ence. It’s the same thing at McDon­alds. At McDon­alds it’s a, they’re not try­ing to sell you food. The prod­uct is not food. The com­mod­i­ty is food. But what, why peo­ple keep going back to McDonald’s is because it is a con­sis­tent expe­ri­ence. It will be a pre­dictable expe­ri­ence. The coke, the burg­er, the fries, they’re all going to taste the same today as they will have tast­ed two months ago, as they will taste two months from now. The same needs to be true for the expe­ri­ence you pro­vide. Peo­ple take com­fort in the famil­iar. You need to be con, you need to be con­sis­tent and you need to be pre­dictable. So, grant­ed that you need these buy­ing criteria’s, or more of these buy­ing cri­te­ria that you need. The clos­er you are to the close, remem­ber, estab­lish the emo­tion­al con­nec­tion. In the sales par­lance it’s called build­ing rap­port. Get them to laugh and you’ll get them to buy. Show out­put and results. Remem­ber, you’re sell­ing; you’re sell­ing a solu­tion which means there’s a prob­lem you’re try­ing to solve. If you’re not try­ing to solve the prob­lem, you’re not adding val­ue.

And then of course pro­vide con­sis­tent and, pro­vide con­sis­tent and pre­dictable expe­ri­ence. If you say that you’ll be there and that you will pro­vide them respons­es with­in the day that you’ve got staffing dur­ing 8am in the morn­ing till 5pm in the after­noon, make sure that you’re avail­able for them dur­ing that peri­od. Con­sis­tent, pre­dictable expe­ri­ences are valu­able.

{slide: Run­down of Tips}

William:

So we want to do a run­down of the pro tips that we men­tioned ear­li­er. You want to show exper­tise. Know your bits of data by heart. And anoth­er clue is, focus on the client. Get that data and make it relate to what they’re expe­ri­enc­ing. Over­come the real­i­ty of small­ness. Think big, look big. Every­thing we have on that Dash­board pro­vides you with the tools to look big. And you just got to think big too. Cause it’s yours as well. And if you’re not research­ing them, you’re com­peti­tors are. It’s all about the prep. It’s like a date. It’s like what Bernard said. If you’re sen­si­tive enough and if you’re pay­ing atten­tion and you’re show­ing inter­est in them and half the band­width and it’s going to work. Next is break­ing the stranger’s bar­ri­er and cre­at­ing an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion. That’s what’s going to build mutu­al trust and respect. And dis­close just enough info. Don’t try to Maven your way through a pitch.

Bernard:

So, I hope you guys are tak­ing notes because tak­ing notes helps you remem­ber things but remem­ber that we will post these pro tips on, on a record­ed video and upload them onto YouTube and send you guys the URL. But I just want­ed to do my own run­down very quick­ly. Show­ing exper­tise, show­ing exper­tise is not you try­ing to Maven your way through a sale. Show­ing exper­tise is about you sim­ply know­ing a few bits and bytes of data by heart. 23% of peo­ple will click SEM results, 62–74% of click through stays on the first page. Only 30% of peo­ple will go to page 2 and page 3. Less than 3% of peo­ple will go beyond the 10th page. These are sam­ple piece of data. There are 28 and a half mil­lion small busi­ness­es in the unit­ed states alone. 60% of them don’t have web­sites. 40% of them want to have web­sites, and 28% of them already own their domain names. Right? Know­ing these pieces of data off the top of your head allows you to become instant expert.

Over­com­ing the real­i­ty of small­ness. Don’t’ look like a one man show. You might be a one man show and there’s noth­ing wrong with that. But you can’t look like a one man show. You have to look big. And to do that you have to think big. Use the Dash­board. Give your­self the edge of hav­ing pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy that backs you up. Next is, you know, do your home­work. If you’re not research­ing them, you’re com­peti­tors are. But more than that if you’re not research­ing them, they’re prob­a­bly research­ing you. You don’t want to walk into a sales pitch with your prospect hav­ing more, more infor­ma­tion about you than you have about them.

Now, break­ing the stranger’s bar­ri­er and cre­at­ing an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion. I wish we could auto­mate this. I wish we could auto­mate this. But the only thing that we can do is put you in a posi­tion that encour­ages this behav­ior. This is why the auto­mat­ed audit only sup­plies so much infor­ma­tion. And why you back it up with the method­ol­o­gy explain­er. And you know, the, the White Papers and so on and so forth. Edu­cat­ing the cus­tomer will cre­ate more ques­tions. The more ques­tions they have, the more fre­quent the points of com­mu­ni­ca­tion with you are. The more fre­quent they talk to you. The more oppor­tu­ni­ty you have to become a friend. The more oppor­tu­ni­ty you have to build that rap­port. Make that con­nec­tion. Break that bar­ri­er.

And then of course the last bit is. You know, dis­close just enough infor­ma­tion. Remem­ber that out of the 28 and a half mil­lion small busi­ness­es, it will not be the major­i­ty that are experts. Espe­cial­ly the ones that have nev­er owned a web­site before. So, dis­close just enough infor­ma­tion, some­thing they can appre­ci­ate, some­thing that clear­ly shows val­ue and some­thing that stays with­in the area of rel­e­vance.

{slide: Take­away}

William:

So we cre­at­ed a starter pitch kit just to help you set­up. Now you can find this in your Resource Cen­ter. So it’s pret­ty much what you can take when you go to a pitch. We start with the part­ner check­list. So a lot of what we’ve spo­ken about, you’re going to find with­in this doc. And hav­ing this on hand will help you at least keep your­self in check.

Bernard:

The part­ner check­list tells you how much you’ve over­come the real­i­ty of small­ness. And how big you will look in front of a client. It’s how much of the prep you’ve done.

William:

Now next is the brand­able base sales deck. This allows you to at least cre­ate an overview of your com­pa­ny or at least of the ser­vices that you’re about to put for­ward.

William:

But it’s just an overview, cause the next one, the next two is prob­a­bly, where how spe­cif­ic it can get. But with the brand­able base sales deck at least you’re approach­ing them from a holis­tic approach.

Bernard:

These are the sales guides, but part of, but part of what com­pris­es these are the site audits, the prod­uct cat­a­logues, the white papers, the case stud­ies. All of these are avail­able inside the Dash­board.

William:

Next you have a web­site a web­site audit guide. So it also allows you to under­stand how our site audit works, It’ll help you explain what the site audit’s all about. And this will help you to pin­point which ones you want to talk about exact­ly.

Bernard:

Alright, and I think, that’s about all we have for acing your next sales pitch and I hope it’s added a lot of val­ue. Now, we won’t con­clude the webi­nar just yet because we did promise that we’d address some of your ques­tions and we had sev­er­al dur­ing the course of the, we had sev­er­al dur­ing the course of the webi­nar.

{slide: Q&A Ses­sion}

So I’ll let Will take the first ques­tion.

William:

Ok, let’s see. It says. So, what do I do if I’ve already had SEO before but I’ve had a bad expe­ri­ence with our old ven­dor? So, my ex, well, I’ve got my own advise on this and Bernard will have his own advise on some of these, but I think at the end of the day our mes­sage will be the same. So, what do I feel about clients who’ve had bad expe­ri­ences with oth­er ven­dors. Here’s the truth, it’s all about solu­tion sell­ing. So let them, let them talk about it, let them tell you all about what’s hap­pened. And of course try to empathize with them. I mean, if you were in the same sit­u­a­tion as they were. If let’s say, oh, my last provider said that they pro­vid­ed most of the things that was on this list and then when I got back to them only a few of what they promised ever hap­pened.

Bernard:

Or guar­an­teed page 1 rank­ing

William:

Or guar­an­teed page one rank­ings. Yes, there’s a dif­fer­ence between guar­an­teed work and guar­an­teed results.

Guar­an­teed work means you’re about to offer qual­i­ty and of course you’re going to be trans­par­ent about it. So please do that. That’s the first thing, like the guy said in my exam­ple. He didn’t get what he had paid for in terms of what he was sup­posed to expect with the work. Then do so and promise him that it’s going to hap­pen, it’s going to change and you’re going to do what you can. It’s also by you can also cre­ate an emo­tion­al con­nec­tion just by lis­ten­ing that way. And respond­ing appro­pri­ate­ly. Pay atten­tion, it’s all their ask­ing cause they just want to rant to you. But, the best part about hav­ing a client that’s had a bad expe­ri­ence, I think it’s an advan­tage. Real­ly. Cause it allows you to, it’ll tell you, there’s a sto­ry already there and if you pay atten­tion enough, you can work off of it and pro­vide a solu­tion. It’s pret­ty direct. I, that’s my, pitch. Be pos­i­tive.

Bernard:

Now for me. If some­body told me they already had SEO before but they had a bad expe­ri­ence with it. Now remem­ber, prob­lem and an oppor­tu­ni­ty, they’re the same thing.

Bernard:

Viewed from a dif­fer­ent angle, right? And if some­body tells me they already had SEO before but had a bad expe­ri­ence with their old ven­dor, the only thing I hear is I’ve done SEO before. I’ve done SEO before. That’s what I hear. And to me, how I will respond to that is that’s great, I won’t say that the bad expe­ri­ence was great, but hon­est­ly it’s great that you’ve done SEO before. That means you’re not a stranger. And you prob­a­bly at some point under­stood the val­ue of invest­ing in SEO activ­i­ties in order to gain results for your web­site. So it already address­es one area of the qual­i­fi­er. Right? They’ve done SEO before and they’ve had a pre­vi­ous ven­dor. Next is you need to find out what hap­pened. Why was there a bad expe­ri­ence? Was it the qual­i­ty in the expe­ri­ence, was it the work, was it the results? Which one didn’t work? More impor­tant than that, how much did they pay? Because SEO dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing just like every­thing else you get what you pay for.

You get what you pay for. And so you’re able to over­come that by telling them one thing. The method­ol­o­gy dri­ves results. We rank cam­paigns. We rank web­sites. And that’s all. Now, you won’t be con­fi­dent of that imme­di­ate­ly off the bat against your first pitch. But the more you work with us, the more con­fi­dent you’ll get and you will know you will be a believ­er in the ser­vice. And you’ll know that every time you enroll a client into it, we are ready to dri­ve results for them. Pos­i­tive results for them.

William:

Here’s the next ques­tion I think Berns, you’re more appro­pri­ate to answer this. How do I build desire and make them trust me.

Bernard:

Now before I talk about this from the per­spec­tive of what we’ve just talked about, I’ll talk about this like a sales­man. For me, build­ing desire is about under­stand­ing what someone’s per­son­al need is, more than the prac­ti­cal need. Obvi­ous­ly if some­one is inter­est­ed in SEO the prac­ti­cal need is they want to rank, they want to dri­ve traf­fic, they want to close sales. That’s real­ly it. That’s the prac­ti­cal, that’s the prac­ti­cal need. And that’s not unique. That’s not unique to any SEO provider. What is unique is how they respond to a per­son­al need. Is the cam­paign being done for van­i­ty, are they doing it to gain an edge in the mar­ket, are they doing it because they want to replace they want their agency, their small bou­tique agency, to replace their job. Why are they doing it? And if you can address that, if you can address the per­son­al need, you can help them build desire. How do you make them trust you?

This one is also sim­ple. Run the audit, give them the White Paper, encour­age them to ask ques­tions and get them to talk to you fre­quent­ly. When you increase the fre­quen­cy of com­mu­ni­ca­tion between two peo­ple, the trust inevitably builds up. And there’s a, there’s a hack. The hack is, get to know them so that you can get them to laugh. Accord­ing to Jef­frey Git­o­mer, and I love this guy. The guy’s a true sales guru. Accord­ing to Jef­frey Git­o­mer, if you can get them to laugh, you can get them to buy. I am a believ­er. I am a believ­er in that. So, the best way to build desire is find com­mon ground with them. Get them to talk to you fre­quent­ly, find out what their per­son­al needs are, addressed the per­son­al need. Be con­sis­tent, be pre­dictable, be their friend. Don’t be a stranger. Be acces­si­ble. All of these help you build trust.

William:

Next ques­tion is do I have to pay extra to run audit reports. I can, I can han­dle this one.

William:

So {laugh­ing}, well, it’s pret­ty quick. So, No. You don’t have to pay extra to run audit reports. It’s free. It’s right there in your Dash­board. And we’ve taught you the steps and it’s all that counts. You don’t have to pay extra. Repeat that. You don’t have to pay extra. It’s free.

Bernard:

Now just to show you guys the kind of expe­ri­ence that you can expect when you work with us, let’s say you’ve run a hun­dred and one audits and remem­ber, just because we offer them to you for free, doesn’t’ mean it costs us noth­ing to pro­duce them. It costs us some­thing to pro­duce them. It costs us some­thing to prod­uct that tech­nol­o­gy and costs us some­thing to be able to con­tin­ue to pro­vide it to part­ners. But when we see some­body gen­er­ate 101 pro­pos­als and have 0 clos­es, expect that our project man­agers will close you. Or they will talk to you, they’ll call you. And they’ll want to find out, where you are hav­ing chal­lenges in the close. Where are you hav­ing chal­lenges in the pitch? Where do I need to help you? Should I invest more time and edu­cat­ing you? Have you gone through a white paper, but they will inves­ti­gate and they’ll try to find a way to make your pitch­es more effec­tive because we don’t want you guys to burn through your leads list.

William:

Exact­ly. And we’ve seen that before.

Bernard:

And like we said in the same way we encour­age you guys to offer val­ue first by offer­ing free stuff, the pro­pos­al gen­er­a­tor is our way of offer­ing val­ue first and giv­ing you guys free stuff.

William:

Which kind of goes to the next ques­tion. Is the pro­pos­al gen­er­a­tor going to be avail­able even if I haven’t bought any ser­vices from you?

Bernard:

So if you’re talk­ing about the pro­pos­al gen­er­a­tor, mean­ing my shame­less plug…

William:

Yeah…

Bernard:

It’s already avail­able for you. If you have cre­at­ed, if you cre­at­ed your Dash­board account, it’s there, it’s live. Right now. Log in, try it. You’ll love it.

William:

Well, because the pro­pos­al gen­er­a­tor allows you to cre­ate it, like we said ear­li­er. You cre­ate the mock­up for your web design, sor­ry for your web­site. And then push out the design, attach it to your pro­pos­al and gen­er­ate it. The invoice is cre­at­ed, but it sits there. There is no charge, we wait for you. And when you feel like you’re ready, take care of the pay­ment, because your client paid you to move for­ward. But you don’t have to, you don’t have to have any oth­er ser­vices with us to start with that. OK, there’s anoth­er ques­tion Bernard and I think this relates to you as well. What if my prospect has an in-house SEO? How do I han­dle that pitch with­out step­ping on their toes?

Bernard:

OK, so, that’s an awe­some ques­tion. I think you can look at it as an advan­tage and dis­ad­van­tage. Most sales peo­ple tend to be adverse to an in-house expert exist­ing in a, dur­ing a, dur­ing a pitch. And I don’t think you, you have to be afraid. If there’s any­body that can vouch for the accu­ra­cy of the data inside your audit, it’s their SEO. If there’s any­body that can vouch for the cor­rect­ness and the val­ue of the White Paper, it’s their SEO. Remem­ber you’ve got a 45 minute to, you’ve got a 45–60 minute pitch that you can do with them. If you set your­self up because you didn’t pre­pare and you’re get­ting ready to get grilled, you are going to get grilled. But if you go there with a gen­uine desire to add val­ue, I don’t think that there will be any toe step­ping. In fact, if there’s any­body that will be able to vouch for the valid­i­ty of the Dash­board, of the, of the audit and of the White Paper, it should be their in-house SEO. So in my opin­ion, it works to your advan­tage.

William:

OK, next ques­tion is what do I say to prospects. Did I. Can I say that I built the Dash­board?

Bernard:

OK, so I’ll answer this one.

So, it’s that sim­ple. We’ve built it for you. It’s pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy. You can tell them that it’s your pro­pri­etary tech­nol­o­gy. We’re not going to run around telling peo­ple, oh that’s not theirs that’s ours. No, that’s not in our best inter­est nor is it in the best inter­est of our prospects and that’s not how we got big. We built the tools for you. If you want to tell them it’s your Dash­board, go ahead and tell them that it’s your Dash­board. Because it is your Dash­board.

William:

The rea­son why we laughed was before we had a client that, instead of say­ing White Label Dash­board, he said white lion Dash­board.

OK, alright, so next ques­tion is, should I mark up the reseller pric­ing on the ini­tial pitch?

Bernard:

OK, great ques­tion. So, and I think this will relate to anoth­er ques­tion about pric­ing. And I will, I will tie those two togeth­er. Should I mark up the reseller pric­ing on the ini­tial pitch and your prices are too high, how can I make it work for me? I’ll answer these ques­tions togeth­er. Should you mark up dur­ing the ini­tial pitch? Yes. Absolute­ly. You must mark up on the ini­tial pitch. Remem­ber that what­ev­er you add onto our prices is the cream you put on your time, on your effort. And so, you can­not deval­ue your own time, you can­not deval­ue your own effort. You can­not deval­ue your own project man­age­ment, your sale skills. Put a pre­mi­um on it. What we will say, is put an appro­pri­ate amount of pre­mi­um on it. You must only charge, and the best advice we give our clients is, charge for the amount of love you intend to give. That’s real­ly the best way for us to advise peo­ple.

And for us, the accept­able rate is to dou­ble or triple what­ev­er our whole­sale rates are inside the Dash­board. Now, for those of you that think the pric­ing is too high and by the way, thou­sands of end clients don’t agree, because we’ve run thou­sands of cam­paigns already, the pric­ing is not too high. You get what you pay for. That is the kind of val­ue that we will be offer­ing. It is a pre­mi­um expe­ri­ence. And because of the pre­mi­um expe­ri­ence, you should be ready to charge pre­mi­um and you shouldn’t be appre­hen­sive to charge pre­mi­um. They will get what they pay for. They will get a pro­pri­etary Dash­board, a method­ol­o­gy that works, trans­par­ent report­ing, real time project man­age­ment vis­i­bil­i­ty. All of this is avail­able to them. So, it’s a pre­mi­um expe­ri­ence, and that’s why you should charge pre­mi­um for it.

William:

And to add you know, when you’re, like we said, dur­ing the pitch you’re to show them and try­ing to offer val­ue. They will get a clue at the start pret­ty much where every­thing is at because of the, because of how exten­sive your reports are, the design, how you’re telling them all this gets updat­ed so often. I think it’s, don’t be afraid, don’t be afraid to put it out there and be pre­pared to defend it.

Bernard:

Now the next ques­tion seems to come from some­one that’s already using the Dash­board. And the ques­tions is, how accu­rate is your Dash­board in terms of show­ing rank­ings. Is it sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter than oth­er tools out there? So, this is a great ques­tion. And I’m going to answer this by say­ing, most of the results that we get on our Dash­board, that we dri­ve on the Dash­board are actu­al­ly sim­i­lar to the oth­er tools out there. There’s not a lot of dis­crep­an­cy between their tech­nol­o­gy and ours. But what I will say is because we under­stand the tech­nol­o­gy behind it, because we built it, it is very accu­rate. It is very accu­rate. The results are tak­en from Google. We aren’t using any PI, we aren’t using some­body else’s tech­nol­o­gy. It was built right here. And so would I say it’s sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter than oth­er tools out there. I wouldn’t say it’s sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter than oth­er tools out there but if I was going to pick between data dri­ven by our Dash­board and one of the third par­ty tools that we also use, I would also take our Dashboard’s word for it. Now, mind you, and this is where you take this with a grain of salt, remem­ber that Google is very good when it comes to cus­tomiz­ing search results based on user pref­er­ence and geo-loca­tion and what not so, there will be dis­crep­an­cies between what you see in real time when you try to mim­ic the query and what the Dash­board reports. But the Dash­board is an objec­tive, accu­rate, result of the rank­ings.

William:

That’s per­fect, that’s great. OK, next ques­tion. How do I han­dle prospects ask­ing very tech­ni­cal ques­tions. I will start and I’ll let Bernard take the half of it because I’m basi­cal­ly, my, the way I work, I’m a con­necter. When I talk to clients, I real­ly try to go for being able to talk to them and Bernard is sort of a sales­man slash Maven.

Bernard:

Well, no, for me I’ve got a sim­ple solu­tion to this ques­tion. How do you han­dle prospects ask­ing very tech­ni­cal ques­tions? Sim­ple. You call us.

You call us. Right? I think busi­ness peo­ple are smart. Small busi­ness, large busi­ness and enter­pris­es and they appre­ci­ate hon­esty…

William:

Right…

Bernard:

And if they are able to dri­ve you into a, if they paint you into a cor­ner, or ask you a ques­tion that’s a lit­tle beyond your capa­bil­i­ties, they will not take offence, if they say, if you say you need to con­sult a tech­ni­cal con­sul­tant, you need to con­sult your in-house SEOs. So, they won’t take offence to that. Park the ques­tion and tell them you’ll get back to them and then as soon as you’re done with the con­ver­sa­tion, call us.

William:

And that, that’s our last ques­tion Bernard.

Bernard:

Well no actu­al­ly we’ve got one last, one more. And it’s the last one. This one says…

William:

How do I access the demo account?

Bernard:

How do I access the demo account? This is sim­ple. If you’ve set up your Dash­board, your demo account is already there. Go to your White Label Dash­board or go to the URL slash your company’s URL because if you haven’t set up the white label ver­sion, it cre­ates the URL by default for you. Log in into your White Label Dash­board, not the agency Dash­board, the White Label Dash­board and log in using the demo cre­den­tials. And you will be able to see every­thing in the demo account. Now, if you’re appre­hen­sive, you’re hav­ing a hard time fig­ur­ing out how to make it work or you need to be able to inter­pret the data and talk about it in your sleep, call us. We’re more than hap­py to, we’re more than hap­py to walk you through the demo account. There is a bit­ly link right on this slide and it’s bitly/getsked. Call us, sched­ule an appoint­ment with a project man­ag­er. Dial our num­ber. William will pick up. Our project man­agers will pick up or you know, and in some sit­u­a­tions I pick up.

So, the demo account is there. It’s live. Login to your White Label Dash­board, demo@demo.com the pass­word is demo and you’ll be able to play around with it. And again if you’ve got more ques­tions, feel free to give us a call.

William:

Now we also want to remind you and let you know that the record­ing will be avail­able. It will be with­in the resource tab of your Dash­board. And we’re going to upload it to YouTube as well.

Bernard:

Now, for those of us that have sent an email about, for those of us that inevitably going to send an email about miss­ing the webi­nar, we are pub­lish­ing it very short­ly. And to those of you that have sent me a per­son­al email, I will send you the URL to where the video is. So, that’s all the time we’ve got for now. If you guys have ques­tions, the invite was sent via my mail­box, you can send me an email. But the best thing that I can rec­om­mend is email us at info@seoreseller.com. Sched­ule a kick, a kick­start call with a project man­ag­er. Or call us. We’re here 24 hours a day, 5 days a week. So thank you very much for join­ing us. On behalf of my part­ner William, I’m Bernard and we’ll look for­ward to see­ing you again on the next Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar.

William:

Bye guys.

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