Boost Your Business!

How To Keep Clients (and keep them com­ing back for more) Webi­nar Tran­script & Video

For your con­ve­nience, we tran­scribed our Boost Your Busi­ness: How To Keep Clients (and keep them com­ing back for more) webi­nar below.

In a hur­ry?
Read the sum­ma­ry and key take­aways

Sign up today to get access to more free resources.

Webinar Transcript

[Down­load­able ver­sion of this tran­script, the pre­sen­ta­tion deck and oth­er mate­ri­als are also avail­able in the Dash­board Resource Cen­ter]

Bernard:

Hel­lo every­one and wel­come back to the Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar and again my name is Bernard San Juan. For all of all you first timers here wel­come. For all the sec­ond and third timers, you know wel­come back.

{slide: Meet Our Pan­elists}

So with me today I’ve got Time. He’s our newest busi­ness devel­op­er and he’s been a project man­ag­er with us for a cou­ple of years. I’ll let Tim do his own intro­duc­tion. Tim?

Tim­o­thy:

Hey there guys, name’s Time and I’ve been with SEOReseller.com for about 2 years now. I’ve done project man­age­ment and I’m now doing busi­ness devel­op­ment for SEOReseller.com. So I’ve in the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing indus­try for about 5 years already. I’ve built rela­tion­ships in the, part­ner rela­tion­ships with our key part­ners and I’ve retained about 500 projects already in my course of expe­ri­ence in the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing realm.

Bernard:

And of course, again, I’m Bernard. I’m a web pro­fes­sion­al of 18 years and I work for you at SEO­Re­seller. Now just for a bit of back­ground. The rea­son I asked Tim to join me on this webi­nar is among our project man­agers Tim has some of the high­est reten­tion suc­cess rates. He retains at an aver­age of about 14 months which is pret­ty impres­sive. And I think the per­fect per­son to dis­cuss the chal­lenges that face what you do in order to retain a client month on month on month would be per­fect­ly dis­cussed with the per­son that’s got the art down [inaudi­ble].

{slide: Recent Dash­board Fea­ture}

Before I move on to meat of the con­ver­sa­tion this is the peri­od for Bernard’s shame­less plugs. And I’m going to do a few quick ones. We have a few recent dash­board fea­tures up. Right after the pre­vi­ous webi­nar a few min­utes after the pre­vi­ous webi­nar we launched the Mock­ups and the Pro­pos­al Cre­ator. The Mock­up is a web design mock­up cre­ator and it allows you to incor­po­rate client feed­back in real time. It works hand in hand with the pro­pos­al cre­ator because the mock­up that you build can be added onto a pro­pos­al cre­ator with a con­tract, an sla and so on and so forth. That allows you to pro­vide pro­fes­sion­al look­ing doc­u­men­ta­tion to your clients after a con­ver­sa­tion and all you have to do is get them to sign on the dot­ted line. Remem­ber that we’re reg­u­lar­ly adding new design sets for busi­ness cat­e­gories for more mock­up options and soon we’ll be deploy­ing the web design project in a way that allows you to launch one with us in as easy as a click of a but­ton.

{slide: Recent Dash­board Fea­ture cont.}

Now my sec­ond shame­less plug is the resource cen­ter. Now in the same way that we advise you guys, we were teach­ing you guys to add val­ue first, the Resource Cen­ter pro­vides you access to tem­plates, brand­able doc­u­ments, client man­age­ment mate­ri­als and allows you to train your own sales team by pro­vid­ing them with guides, method­ol­o­gy explain­ers and prod­uct sheets. We’re con­stant­ly adding new mate­r­i­al to the resource cen­ter and now it’s avail­able in US, UK and Aus­tralian Eng­lish. So be sure to check that out right after the webi­nar.

{slide: Com­ing soon}

Last plug, I promise is, and I believe Tim will have one in the webi­nar, is the dash­board feed­back mod­ule. Com­ing soon we will be enabling small busi­ness­es, your cus­tomers to gath­er their pos­i­tive reviews and grow their online rep­u­ta­tion from the dash­board. The feed­back mod­ule is just one com­po­nent of our com­plete online rep­u­ta­tion man­age­ment suite. And it’ll include online rep­u­ta­tion mon­i­tor­ing, cita­tion list­ings and review man­age­ment. As soon as that’s up, we will make sure to com­mu­ni­cate it with you guys post haste.

{slide: Boost Your Busi­ness Webi­nar Recap}

Before I get into today’s Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar I just want­ed to briefly cov­er what we dis­cussed in the pre­vi­ous Boost Your Busi­ness webi­na­rs in case some of you missed it. On the first Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar the one that I did with Ita­mar, we talked about becom­ing a Pow­er­house in less than a year. And there are just a cou­ple of key points I want­ed to high­light. First one being know­ing when to take it seri­ous­ly. When do you moon­light being a dig­i­tal agency and when do you treat it like your career, like your busi­ness. You need to know when it’s that valu­able to you. The next one is begin with your close net­work. Once you decide that it’s more than just moon­light­ing, more than just free­lanc­ing, where do you get your first set of clients and we’ve been get­ting these ques­tions a lot. The answer is your first set of clients are clos­er to you than you think. They would be peo­ple that are either with­in your close prox­im­i­ty, with­in your per­son­al net­work or with­in your per­son­al network’s close per­son­al net­work.

The next one is auto­mate as much as you can and that’s real­ly just you using the dash­board because when you start out you will be a one man show but you don’t need to appear like a one man show. Auto­mate as much as you can because it’s hard bal­anc­ing being your own sales­man, your own project man­ag­er and your own busi­ness own­er. And then edu­cate your­self. We under­stand that some of you guys are pros, but some of you will not be. Feel free to edu­cate your­self on the mate­r­i­al that we’ve got on the dash­board and if there’s any mate­r­i­al of inter­est to you ring our project man­ag­er. We are more than hap­py to edu­cate you ;guys in terms of the indus­try. Also, know when to get help. When are you larg­er than a one man show. And know when it’s time to hire help; an assis­tant, a part­ner, but some­thing, because again, you can’t be your own busi­ness own­er, sales and project man­ag­er for a pro­longed peri­od of time. The next one is a growth hack and it’s sim­ply, niche. It is eas­i­er to be the mas­ter of one niche than to be a jack of all traits. And then of course use a sys­tem and method­ol­o­gy that works or work with us.

On the sec­ond webi­nar we talked about acing your next sales pitch. And there’s real­ly just a few bul­lets here. First one being be an instant expert. Know the lit­tle bits and bites of data that you can call of the top of your head in order to appear like an instant expert. Know the lit­tle tid bits, the lit­tle facts, the lat­est news. Last arti­cle dis­cussed on the Google Web­mas­ter blog in order to build your cred­i­bil­i­ty in the indus­try. The next one is look big, by think­ing big. Mean­ing every­one starts off as a one man show. You don’t have to look like a one man show. Use the dash­board, show them that you’re invest­ed in the tech­nol­o­gy. Do not report with Google Docs, do not report with Word doc­u­ments. Lever­age the tech­nol­o­gy to make you look like you are well entrenched and well invest­ed in the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing space.

The next one is know your prospect. And I’ll coin Eric Schmidt here. In the inter­net cen­tu­ry if you’re not Googling them, they are Googling you. Respect the time of your prospect. Know who they are and pre­pare for what their needs might be. And lis­ten while you’re in the pitch, make sure you’re lis­ten­ing to them. The last bul­let point I want­ed to dis­cuss on acing your next sales pitch is about cre­at­ing desire. And cre­at­ing desire, you know more than just adding val­ue, mean­ing giv­ing them a ser­vice that actu­al­ly works. You have to give them some­thing they’re not pay­ing for. And that’s you edu­cat­ing them on the indus­try; why you’re doing cer­tain things. Give them edu­ca­tion­al mate­r­i­al; give them access to the dash­board. All of this before they spend the first dol­lar with you. Peo­ple like to rec­i­p­ro­cate good­will. You can use that to your advan­tage to close the sale.

{slide: Stats}

Now, let’s get onto the meat of this con­ver­sa­tion. Before I do, let’s dig into some stats. Did you know, our begin­ner agen­cies have an aver­age reten­tion rate of about 4.25 months. In con­trast our pow­er­house agen­cies, our pow­er­house part­ners have a reten­tion rate of a year and a half to two years. That is stark con­trast. A fac­tor of more than 5 in terms of reten­tion capa­bil­i­ty. Some of our accounts here at SEO­Re­seller are over four years old. Some of them have a tenure that’s longer than mine. And SEOReseller’s reten­tion rate aver­ages over a year and that’s con­sid­er­ing we intake hun­dreds of month 1 cam­paigns every month. They sort of dri­ve the aver­age down, but our aver­age reten­tion rate or aver­age bat­ting rate once we take on a cam­paign, most of the time we will retain them for a year or bet­ter. And pow­er­house part­ners exe­cute a growth hack in order to retain their cus­tomers and this is by putting them in a con­tract. Tim and I will dis­cuss this a bit more as we move for­ward through the pre­sen­ta­tion. But I guess I’ll start us off by ask­ing Tim a ques­tion. Tim, your reg­u­lar­ly in touch with clients. What do they usu­al­ly face in terms of reten­tion chal­lenges?

{slide: Dis­cus­sion Overview}

Tim­o­thy:

Wow that’s real­ly ques­tion Bernard. I’ll answer that ques­tion based off on my recent con­ver­sions I’ve had with part­ners. One of the biggest chal­lenges they encounter on their reten­tion is actu­al­ly client fall­outs, sud­den can­cel­la­tions of their cam­paigns. And you could fac­tor those into some issues. One of which is not being able to put them on con­tracts. They take you by sur­prise. They can­cel after month 2, month 3 and they’re gone. The oth­er issue that I usu­al­ly get from our part­ners is that they have not set their expec­ta­tions prop­er­ly with them. Mean­ing they didn’t see eye to eye. They weren’t on the same page. So those are some of the rea­sons why they are hav­ing prob­lems with their reten­tion.

And this is great, because what we’re about to dis­cuss with you in this webi­nar is some key point­ers on how to keep your clients and keep them com­ing back for more. Like what it says in this slide in this webi­nar we want to share you some insights and tips on how to retain your clients and fos­ter loy­al­ty to your busi­ness. Know your base­line, set goals, high­light suc­cess, add more val­ue to your clients and nev­er stop look­ing for ways to dri­ve more busi­ness.

Bernard:

At the end of the webi­nar we’ll have a Q&A ses­sion, but I just want­ed to remind every­one. Feel free to send your ques­tions in advance using the WebEx chat. You don’t have to wait till the end of the webi­nar to start­ing typ­ing in your ques­tions. You can do that at any point in time in the pre­sen­ta­tion. I promise Tim and I will not be inter­rupt­ing.

{slide: Know Your Base­line Cov­er}

We’ll move on to the next top­ic which is know­ing your base­line and I want to start it off with a case study.

{slide: Know Your Base­line | Case Study #1}

For our first case study we want to talk about us and our his­to­ry and when SEO­Re­seller start­ed in 2011 we want­ed to grow. But we didn’t want to be lucky. We didn’t want to grow inci­den­tal­ly, we want­ed to grow delib­er­ate­ly. Mean­ing we want­ed to be con­sis­tent, we want­ed to be pre­dictable, we want­ed to be suc­cess­ful by design. What we need­ed to do was we need­ed to fig­ure out where did we stand in terms of our abil­i­ty to retain our cus­tomers and let me tell you. We were shocked to real­ize that when­ev­er we took someone’s busi­ness we were able to work on their cam­paign for about an aver­age of three and a quar­ter months only. It was a real eye open­er and then we had to fig­ure out strate­gi­cal­ly what’s the ide­al life cycle, what’s the ide­al life span they should spend with us in order to achieve the best results for SEO and we all mutu­al­ly agreed it was 6 months. And so we set out a goal for our­selves to hit a lifes­pan goal of six months for every cam­paign. With­in the same year our aver­age reten­tion rate went from three point twen­ty three months to sev­en months. And so we beat our goal and that meant a hun­dred and fif­teen per­cent increase with­in the same year. As of today our aver­age reten­tion is when­ev­er we work on a cam­paign we will prob­a­bly work with them for a year or bet­ter. That is near­ly triple an increase from our ini­tial year. Actu­al­ly that’s about four time, almost four times increase from our ini­tial year. And we’re very proud of that.

{slide: Know Your Base­line}

Tim­o­thy:

More about know­ing your base­line. Bernard was dis­cussing ear­li­er how you need to know what you’re start­ing point is. The first bit to this is you have to cal­cu­late the num­ber of clients that signed up and remained with the agency. On the pre­vi­ous webi­nar we dis­cussed about iden­ti­fy­ing and estab­lish­ing the niche you want to tar­get. This is also impor­tant in being able to iden­ti­fy how you are going to be able to retain your clients. Because you have to know where you’re going to start before you retain you need to know a base­line of your clients. Every busi­ness has a clos­ing ratio. If you’re not clos­ing a cer­tain per­cent­age then you don’t know what your base­line is. So you need to know which clients you want to take care of and retain grow with you. The sec­ond bit is. Actu­al­ly this is an impor­tant ques­tion that every­one should ask them­selves. Espe­cial­ly small busi­ness part­ners out there. How do you avoid client can­cel­la­tions and fall­outs? I’ve sort of answered this ear­li­er in my answer to Bernard. But there’s three things you need to know. You have to put your clients in a con­tract. Now I know some clients get scared when you present them with a con­tract, but the truth is it’s actu­al­ly, it costs sev­en times more to gain new clients than it does keep­ing your exist­ing clients so you bet­ter get them on a con­tract.

Bernard:

Now more than that I think we all also under­es­ti­mate that most busi­ness­es that you engage, they will expect to be put in a con­tract. That’s first things firsts. There’s noth­ing bad about mak­ing cus­tomers easy to enter and easy to exit. But the rea­son we try to teach you guys to put clients in a con­tract is it’s a growth hack. It is far eas­i­er to learn how to sell a con­tract than it is to become an SEO expert, or a dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing expert over night. After 18 years of expe­ri­ence I can’t even claim I know every­thing in dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing. But I can teach you how to sell a con­tract in one to two ses­sions. It’s way eas­i­er to learn how to get clients to sign the dot­ted line because con­tracts offer secu­ri­ty and com­mit­ment. I’ll let Tim move on to the next one.

Tim­o­thy:

Set expec­ta­tions. This is what I was say­ing ear­li­er about you and the client or your cus­tomer meet­ing eye to eye or being on the same page. You have to know what your client’s goals are. You have to be on the same page with them and so you don’t promise them the moon and the stars, you have to tell them exact­ly what you’re going to deliv­er and what they should expect at the end of the cam­paign. The last bit would be con­stant cam­paign updates. We will expand on that lat­er There’s a lot of things we pro­vide here at SEOReseller.com that actu­al­ly helps you pro­vide your clients sta­tus updates.

Bernard:

Now if you’ve not set a goal for your­self before, it would be fair for you to set an accept­able aver­age reten­tion rate of six months for you because this is where the effects of SEO can real­ly be felt. Now, pro tip. You can’t improve if you don’t know where you are. You can­not move for­ward if you don’t know where the start­ing point is. And the oth­er thing that we want­ed to put is that it costs sev­en times more to get new clients in the door than it does to keep the ones you’ve got hap­py.

{slide: Set Goals Cov­er}

On set­ting goals. We’ve got anoth­er case study to dis­cuss with you.

{slide: Set Goals | Case Study #2}

And this one was with a bud­ding agency that we were work­ing with in Aus­tralia. They began as an exclu­sive­ly as a web devel­op­ment solu­tions provider. So they were a web design com­pa­ny. The prob­lem with being or with offer­ing only web design is that it’s a revolv­ing door. Rev­enue comes in, rev­enue comes out. You’ve got to have sales­man on the field. If they’re not clos­ing, you don’t make recur­ring rev­enue next month. And they need­ed a mod­el that secured and made the rev­enue pre­dictable and so they moved onto an adjunct indus­try which is SEO. Now when they got in, there was no in-house SEO expert and they fre­quent­ly got them­selves into hot water by over-promis­ing because again, they were try­ing to learn how to become experts over night. In order to solve the prob­lem, we had to go into a pro­gram with them to teach them how to get clients signed into a con­tract. And it wasn’t an easy con­ver­sa­tion because they weren’t used to it. They were used to web devel­op­ment SLA’s which lasts all of thir­ty days. But get­ting peo­ple to sign a rela­tion­ship with you for the next six months they thought was going to be dif­fi­cult. When we taught them to over­come their own men­tal objec­tions and they start­ed imple­ment­ing con­tracts with their clients, they grew and their aver­age reten­tion increased from four months to six in the next hun­dred days. As of today they are an 80% SEO rev­enue gen­er­at­ing com­pa­ny. Pro tip, know the strengths of the method­ol­o­gy. Don’t try to be an instant expert over night. Learn­ing how to sell a con­tract is eas­i­er than learn­ing to be an expert in a span of a few days. Know what the method­ol­o­gy can do. Under­stand the goal and mar­ry the goal to the expec­ta­tions that you set.

{slide: Set Goals}

Tim­o­thy:

Let’s talk more about set­ting goals. First thing you need to under­stand is that you have to know the method­ol­o­gy that you work with. In essence this is also being able to com­mu­ni­cate direct­ly with your project man­ag­er and being on the same page with what they’re rec­om­mend­ing to your clients. You have to make sure that this trans­lates to the prop­er set­ting of expec­ta­tions with your cus­tomers. If you under­stand what your client’s goals are for their busi­ness, for exam­ple we’re talk­ing about rev­enue; we’re talk­ing about return on invest­ment or even con­ver­sions, then ask the expert. You will then know what type of strate­gies need­ed on your end or our end so we can exe­cute based off of our set goals.

Bernard:

One thing I want­ed to add on goal set­ting is. If you’ve set a goal for your­self of let’s say twelve months’ reten­tion, in a book by John Maxwell called the 21 Irrefutable Laws of Lead­er­ship he talks about the law of Mount Ever­est. And the law of Mount Ever­est is quite sim­ply break­ing down one ginor­mous goal into sev­er­al small­er, soft goals. You need to fig­ure out the activ­i­ties you need to do to accom­plish incre­men­tal wins. If you’re cur­rent aver­age reten­tion rate is some­where around 5 months and your ide­al tar­get is 18, you’re not going to get from 5 to 18 overnight. You’re going to have to imple­ment strate­gies that get you from 5 to 6 to 12 to 18. And each of those soft goals have dif­fer­ent activ­i­ties involved. So putting clients in a con­tract is just one hack that you can exe­cute to do that. Mean­ing quick­ly win the six to twelve month tenure. But it isn’t the only solu­tion to you being able to retain clients. And we’ll show you some of the oth­er tricks you can do to do that. Work close­ly with your project man­ag­er to make sure you’re choos­ing the cor­rect cam­paigns in order to ful­fill those goals.

Tim­o­thy:

That’s what I’ve been… I keep on say­ing this ear­li­er. You have to work close­ly with your project man­ag­er in order to make sure that you under­stand what your client needs and you under­stand what we are rec­om­mend­ing. So for those of you who have recur­ring accounts with us already, you already have your project man­agers. Whether that’s Gary, Car­lo, CJ or Eric, who­ev­er that may be. You can con­tact them direct­ly if you need help. We are avail­able for you guys twen­ty four hours a day, five days a week, so give us a call. And again, here’s my shame­less plug. As Bernard pre-empt­ed you guys ear­li­er. For those who don’t have one yet, you can give me a call. Con­tact me direct­ly. My num­bers are 415 625 9700 ext 1013. Add me up on Skype or LinkedIn.

{slide: High­light Suc­cess Cov­er}

Bernard:

We’ll move on to the next top­ic and we want to dis­cuss high­light­ing suc­cess, and this is real­ly you now, get­ting the con­tract signed and then nur­tur­ing the rela­tion­ship. Before I move onto the next case study I just want­ed to remind every­one. I’m see­ing that the chat is very active, but I want­ed to remind every­one, feel free to send the ques­tions as they pop in off the top of your head.

{slide: High­light Suc­cess | Case Study #3}

On high­light­ing suc­cess the case study that we want­ed to dis­cuss is one of the banks that worked with us and start­ed a cam­paign. The cam­paign ran for a peri­od of 12 months and when they began with us they had only 64 key­words vis­i­ble on the first page. Through the dura­tion of the 12 month peri­od, they increased their first page rank­ings from 64 to over 2000 rank­ing key­words. Guess how many times we were there to tell them take a look at what we’ve put on the first page. We did it every time. We made sure to do it every time. Because this is pre­cise­ly what we were try­ing to do. High­light suc­cess. High­light the effect of the work that we’re doing and show them how it was adding val­ue to their busi­ness goals. So here’s a pro tip. Be the bear­er of news. And I’ve said this as ear­ly as the first webi­nar. You have to be the bear­er of news, good or bad. In our expe­ri­ence in deal­ing with hun­dreds and hun­dreds of web­sites month in and month out what we’ve dis­cov­ered is that cus­tomers and clients, they don’t real­ly care so much about you bear­ing bad news. What they mind is when they have to dis­cov­er bad news by them­selves and then they have to chase you up for an answer. You have to proac­tive­ly offer infor­ma­tion. The rea­son we retain so well is because we’re always the bear­er of news. Good or bad. Cus­tomers mind a lack of input more than they lack bad input. Make sure that you’re there, that you’re always the bear­er of news.

{slide: High­light Suc­cess}

Tim­o­thy:

I’ll dive deep­er on high­light­ing suc­cess. The first key point to this one is you have to estab­lish your client’s busi­ness goals.

Bernard:

Agreed.

Tim­o­thy:

You have to know what they want in order to achieve their goals in their busi­ness. You have to know what the method would be. It’s not a one way chan­nel. You have to make sure that this actu­al­ly makes sense. You’re not going to over-deliv­er or under-deliv­er. You’re just set­ting them the prop­er goals.

Bernard:

It’s also the right way to start. Like Cov­ey says in 7 Habits, begin with the end in mind. You can’t set prop­er expec­ta­tions; you can’t man­age expec­ta­tions if you don’t know what goals you’re try­ing to man­age.

Tim­o­thy:

Man­age the expec­ta­tions from the start so that there are no sur­pris­es. A good exam­ple for me is when you’re try­ing to select key­words for a SEO cam­paign. You know for a fact that about 70 – 80% of your key­word selec­tion influ­ences the suc­cess of your cam­paign. If you’re not able to man­age your client’s expec­ta­tions on what to rank in terms of your key­words then you’ve already failed at the start. On to the next bul­let point. Cre­ate desire con­tin­u­ous­ly by com­mu­ni­cat­ing the fol­low­ing. Progress, mile­stones and project sta­tus.

Bernard:

I just want to jump in here quick­ly. The way you dis­tin­guish the three is, progress is what you’ve done bet­ter than this month than you did last month and whether it’s traf­fic, refer­rals or bet­ter rank­ings, bet­ter vis­i­bil­i­ty. That’s progress. Mile­stones would be how you’ve pro­gressed through the work that’s get­ting done, mean­ing did you com­plete all the onpage, what results did it dri­ve, have you begun doing link acqui­si­tion, have you begun improv­ing their dig­i­tal foot­print. And then project sta­tus is real­ly your oppor­tu­ni­ty to hold your cus­tomer equal­ly account­able to the suc­cess of the cam­paign. That’s all we mean when we say progress, mile­stones and project sta­tus.

Tim­o­thy:

Much like you’re in a rela­tion­ship with your part­ner, you have to cre­ate your desire con­tin­u­ous­ly with them. It doesn’t stop in month 1. It has to be month on month. Anoth­er thing you want to remem­ber is you have to spot oppor­tu­ni­ties for your client to lever­age. This is why you have to be the bear­er of the news. We’re not telling you to lie to your clients. We’re telling you to tell them the bad news if there is. There’s bad news, tell them. Clients appre­ci­ate trans­paren­cy between you. It’s a busi­ness. You have to let them know. The last bit would be keep­ing your clients on board with the process and this is more effec­tive if you have a real­ly close rela­tion­ship between you and your project man­ag­er.

Bernard:

Also observe the progress of the cam­paign. Observe the progress of the project and if it’s trend­ing well, this is an easy win for you. This an easy way to keep them on board with the process. Going back to the con­cept of a busi­ness rela­tion­ship because that is what you’re try­ing to do. You’re try­ing to solid­i­fy your rela­tion­ship with your client in order to retain them. All of these bul­lets are just meant to do one thing. Cre­ate oppor­tu­ni­ties for increased engage­ment. Rela­tion­ships are fueled by com­mu­ni­ca­tion and all of these bul­lets encour­age one form of com­mu­ni­ca­tion or anoth­er with clients. Pro top here quick­ly. High­light the pre­vi­ous suc­cess to show the cam­paign is build­ing momen­tum. And if you guys have seen what our exec­u­tive sum­maries are like, what our reports are like, this is pre­cise­ly what they’re designed to do. All those lit­tle nice green num­bers, those lit­tle green arrow up icons, what they do is they show you the incre­men­tal increase from pre­vi­ous month to cur­rent month. I’ll move on to adding more val­ue to clients…

{slide: Add More Val­ue to Clients Cov­er}

…and remem­ber feel free to add any ques­tions and I’ll start us off again with anoth­er case study on adding more val­ue to clients.

{slide: Add More Val­ue to Clients | Case Study #4}

This one I’m par­tic­u­lar­ly proud of. We had to exe­cute a cam­paign for a web­site for a promi­nent fig­ure and his ini­tial goal was more vis­i­bil­i­ty. His idea of more vis­i­bil­i­ty was cre­at­ing a sec­ond pen­guin proof mir­ror web­site. This is a dif­fi­cult con­ver­sa­tion. I think if your customer’s were all experts, then yes go ahead and do what they ask you to do. But the real­i­ty is if they were strong dig­i­tal mar­keters them­selves, they would not hire experts. In order for you to do jus­tice to your rela­tion­ship with your cus­tomer, you have to be the expert they need and some­times that means being the expert that tells them they’re wrong. In this sit­u­a­tion it was going to put us in a tough con­ver­sa­tion because if any of you are SEO savvy, you already know, dupli­cate con­tent is a bad idea. It’s a bad idea. I can’t even stress how bad enough. It’s a bad idea. How could we add val­ue to a guy that want­ed to exe­cute a strat­e­gy that was obvi­ous­ly a bad idea. We had to wear the expert hat and have the tough con­ver­sa­tion and guide them into the right way to dri­ve that. We began with the end in mind, we asked the cus­tomer, we asked the part­ner. What are they real­ly try­ing to do? What is the end in mind? What is the busi­ness goal? And what we real­ized by ask­ing the right ques­tions was they real­ly just want­ed more traf­fic. More traf­fic, more leads, more sign ups. And of course the cus­tomer had tac­ti­cal goals of hav­ing anoth­er web­site. The wrong way to have exe­cut­ed that would have been to do exact­ly what they said so we changed gears a bit and we told them. Why don’t we instead of build­ing a mir­ror site, build you a com­ple­men­tary web­site.

And of course we didn’t want that web­site to can­ni­bal­ize the rank­ings of the orig­i­nal brand­ing web­site. Instead of dri­ving leads and mak­ing this sec­ond web­site more on page rel­e­vant for the same terms, we focus on their social pres­ence. Did they have a Face­book account, a Twit­ter account, a Youtube chan­nel. And point­ed all of these now onto the sec­ond prop­er­ty. And even­tu­al­ly what we found was that we retained the cam­paign for a total of 14 months and in 4 months it earned so much equi­ty for its brand name that when you looked for the name of the promi­nent fig­ure, the sec­ond web­site appeared on the sec­ond result next to the pri­ma­ry web­site. And it start­ed gain­ing inci­den­tal rank­ings for terms that were sim­i­lar as the main web­site. More than that, it drove refer­ral traf­fic to the site com­ing from the social engage­ment. And so the strat­e­gy was to engage strangers, engage poten­tial cus­tomers from social chan­nels and then con­clude that expe­ri­ence in the web­site.

{slide: Add More Val­ue to Clients}

On adding more val­ue to clients, here’s a pro tip. And before I jump into the pro tip, there are real­ly two con­cepts that I want to point out. There’s a social con­cept called moral imper­a­tive. And in Rolf Dobelli’s book called, The Art Of Think­ing Clear­ly he high­lights a think­ing bias we’ve got called reci­procity. A moral imper­a­tive means you always mean well and peo­ple tend to rec­i­p­ro­cate good inten­tions, good behav­ior. It is so impor­tant that you change your agency’s inter­nal lan­guage from; how do I make more mon­ey off my client, my cus­tomer to how do I add more val­ue.

Tim­o­thy:

One of the things, espe­cial­ly for SEO savvies out there. You know for a fact that you can check your client’s website’s Google Ana­lyt­ics data. You have to look into it and see where the traffic’s com­ing from. Is it com­ing from Organ­ic traf­fic, is it paid search traf­fic, is it social, is it refer­ral? You can spot oppor­tu­ni­ties right there where you can lever­age and add more val­ue to their cam­paign. This is you not say­ing to your client how I can get more of your mon­ey. No. In the pro tip it says, change your agency’s inter­nal lan­guage to how can i add more val­ue to my client. You’ve got to ask the right ques­tions. It’s not about you get­ting more busi­ness out of them. It’s you grow­ing with the client. Anoth­er thing is you have to be flex­i­ble; you’ve got to mod­i­fy your strat­e­gy if you can add more val­ue. Remem­ber that SEO is not the end game of the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing realm. There’s a lot more to it. There’s social media, there’s pay per click. You can even con­sid­er try­ing to redesign the web­site to improve con­ver­sions. There’s a lot of things you can do. Third thing is, be proac­tive with your clients. I want to use the key­word proac­tive because we have instilled this in our com­pa­ny. It’s one of our core val­ues. Being proac­tive. In the same man­ner that our project man­agers, all of us here, are being proac­tive with you when it comes to report­ing, when it comes to pro­vid­ing sta­tus updates with your clients, we want you to trans­late that being proac­tive to your clients as well. And the last bit is high­light pos­i­tive results, com­pare with past reports. We have exec­u­tive sum­maries; we have ad hoc updates to give your clients. If there’s a big jump on their rank­ings, be the one to tell them. If there’s an upcom­ing algo­rithm update from Google, be the expert, tell them right away. They would appre­ci­ate that.

Bernard:

Going back on being proac­tive. You guys have to under­stand that most of the time, and when I’m say­ing most of the time, I’m talk­ing 90% of the time; we don’t have direct access to the web­site own­er. We have to be extra proac­tive; we have to be extra proac­tive because a dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing strat­e­gy only works when it’s tru­ly col­lab­o­ra­tive. But we nev­er get to col­lab­o­rate with the web­site own­er at any point in time in a reseller rela­tion­ship or in a part­ner rela­tion­ship. There­fore our employ­ees have to be extra proac­tive, espe­cial­ly our project man­ag­er. Going back to high­light­ing pos­i­tive results, I’m going to men­tion again some­thing I men­tioned before. The exec­u­tive sum­maries, all the reports that we send you guys, they are engi­neered to high­light pos­i­tive results, pos­i­tive trends. They are com­par­a­tive in nature. Allow­ing you to draw from the pre­vi­ous suc­cess or from the cur­rent suc­cess of the cur­rent month com­pared to pre­vi­ous months’ achieve­ments.

{slide: Add More Val­ue to Clients cont.}

Tim­o­thy:

More to adding more val­ue to your clients. Always stay rel­e­vant and find ways you can add val­ue through chan­nels you haven’t explored yet. This goes back to you explor­ing oth­er options in the mar­ket­ing realm for your client and I think one tip I would advise every­one is that you have to be in the know. You have to know what’s going on with the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing indus­try. Read arti­cles online, sub­scribe to our blog, it’s even bet­ter. We keep our­selves up to date with eh lat­est trends in the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing realm. You can always talk to us, talk to Bernard, we’re here to talk to you guys. The next bit is a holis­tic mar­ket­ing approach, more than just SEO. Like I said SEO is not the end game of the dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing strate­gies. We have oth­er options out there. I know that some of you guys may have been doing this for years now and you might con­sid­er your­selves, I would say, SEO’s, but there’s more to just SEO. You have to explore your options. Last but not the least is adjust cam­paign rec­om­men­da­tions rel­e­vant to the fol­low­ing. Vis­i­bil­i­ty or SERP rank­ings, web­site traf­fic, leads or goal con­ver­sions. This is where I would like to site an exam­ple of a cam­paign that’s reached about 6 months already with you. You may know that you have to revis­it the key­words in order to find more oppor­tu­ni­ties or more prod­ucts and ser­vices to cov­er instead of the one you’ve used. Or in terms of leads and goal con­ver­sions maybe it’s time to redesign the web­site in order to improve your con­ver­sions.

Bernard:

I know we’re called SEO­Re­seller but unlike Moz, we can’t drop just drop the SEO and be called Reseller. [laugh­ing]

Tim­o­thy:

[laugh­ing]

Bernard:

Talk­ing about holis­tic mar­ket­ing approach and more than just SEO. This goes back to the pre­vi­ous pre­sen­ta­tion, the pre­vi­ous slides in the pre­sen­ta­tion where we were talk­ing about under­stand­ing the mar­ket­ing goals. And it’s about vis­i­bil­i­ty, traf­fic and leads. You also have to under­stand what is the time frame. If the cus­tomer you’re talk­ing to is look­ing to gen­er­ate a mas­sive amount of leads in a short span of time against a rel­a­tive­ly young web­site, then you already know SEO is not the right strat­e­gy. But you shouldn’t be appre­hen­sive about talk­ing to them about alter­na­tive means of accom­plish­ing that goal. Social media cam­paigns, Adwords, Google Dis­play Net­work. You can’t be afraid to dis­cuss these adjunnkdigi9tal mar­ket­ing strate­gies with your cus­tomers. Remem­ber you’re the pro. If you’re walk­ing into a con­ver­sa­tion and you feel that this is where the con­ver­sa­tion might lead to, and you’re not entire­ly com­fort­able, call us. Call us. We will train you to be com­fort­able dis­cussing these top­ics. There are experts in dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing galore peo­ple in the office. And we’re ready to take your call. Even on your off hours because we’re here 24 hours a day, 5 days a week. The most impor­tant bit is, under­stand the goal and offer a strat­e­gy that deliv­ers the goal.

{slide: Nev­er Stop Look­ing For Ways To Dri­ve More Busi­ness Cov­er}

Now, one more bit, and I per­son­al­ly am real­ly attached to this sec­tion of the pre­sen­ta­tion. It’s about, it’s talk­ing about nev­er stop­ping to look for ways to dri­ve more busi­ness.

{slide: Nev­er Stop Look­ing For Ways To Dri­ve More Busi­ness | Case Study #5}

We’ve got the fifth case study in this sit­u­a­tion, and this is not the same bank we talked about in the pre­vi­ous slides. In 2013 we acquired a bil­lion dol­lar bank as a client and they had an annu­al bud­get of $24 000. Now you know, $24 000 sounds like a lot of mon­ey. But, they’re a bil­lion dol­lar bank. [laugh­ing]

Tim­o­thy:

Whoop di doo [laugh­ing]

Bernard:

So the reac­tions real­ly go [pen click­ing]. But we under­stand that in spite of SEO being a par­tic­u­lar­ly old indus­try, it’s almost two decades old, for those of you guys that didn’t know, some peo­ple just need to see its ini­tial impact before they become finan­cial­ly and emo­tion­al­ly invest­ed in dig­i­tal as a strat­e­gy. Show them that SEO can increase traf­fic, bring in new vis­i­tors, dri­ve bet­ter engage­ment, increase brand vis­i­bil­i­ty and you will see results sim­i­lar to the results we saw with this spe­cif­ic client. They increased their annu­al bud­get from $24 000 the pre­vi­ous year to over $300 000 the fol­low­ing year.

Tim­o­thy:

There you go.

Bernard:

That is an 1150% increase in their bud­get or, in short, that’s an increase in bud­get by over a fac­tor 10.

{slide: Nev­er Stop Look­ing For Ways To Dri­ve More Busi­ness}

SEO is old­er than 2 decades, in fact anoth­er tid bit of here is, I’m not sure if you guys are aware but, Bruce Clay is cred­it­ed for coin­ing the term SEO. And he sup­pos­ed­ly coined the term as ear­ly as 1996, that’s 2 years before Google was Google. And SEO is still rel­a­tive­ly unknown in a mar­ket­ing study it was dis­cov­ered that 90% of the web­sites on the World Wide Web belong to small to medi­um sized busi­ness­es and 91% of them are not opti­mized. This is why some­times you will walk in into busi­ness­es that are estab­lished or mom and pop shops that have been around for decades and when you start talk­ing about dig­i­tal, it either looks like you’re pulling a rab­bit out of a hat or it looks like you’re star­ing on head­lights. SEO is still rel­a­tive­ly unknown. You have to be the edu­ca­tor and some­times all it takes is to get their prover­bial feet wet and once they do, they start feel­ing the finan­cial jus­ti­fi­ca­tion to spend more on dig­i­tal as a strat­e­gy. This is pre­cise­ly what hap­pened with us and the bank. Nev­er stop find­ing ways to help your client. Peo­ple rec­i­p­ro­cate good­will, good inten­tions and peo­ple invest in results.

{slide: Nev­er Stop Look­ing For Ways To Dri­ve More Busi­ness Cont.}

Tim­o­thy:

I’d like to just add what Bernard has already estab­lished on look­ing for more ways to dri­ve more busi­ness. You have to make sure that you are evolv­ing and grow­ing with your cus­tomers. It’s not a one way com­mu­ni­ca­tion, it’s not a one way rela­tion­ship. You have to grow with them as they grow. Focus on more than just one mar­ket­ing chan­nel. I can’t empha­size more how much I believe that more than just SEO is what you’re client’s main need in terms of dri­ving more busi­ness to their com­pa­ny. You have to under­stand your customer’s busi­ness and mar­ket­ing goals. This is you and the client see­ing eye to eye on what needs to be done and has to be accom­plished for their busi­ness. If they’re after traf­fic, you have to make sure you’re imple­ment­ing the right strate­gies. The same goes with oth­er goals. You have to inter­vene in a cam­paign when it means achiev­ing bet­ter results. Now this is you not antag­o­niz­ing the client. This is you wear­ing the expert hat and say­ing to the client, this is what’s going to work with your cam­paign. We know the bat­tles we can win and we know the bat­tles we can’t win.

Bernard:

Some­times that even means chang­ing gears. When I say chang­ing gears I mean change up the key­words, because the ini­tial key­words are incred­i­bly dif­fi­cult to rank for. It is sig­nif­i­cant­ly bet­ter to dri­ve rel­e­vant vis­its from long tail key­words today than invest 12 – 18 months worth of work to try to gun for an incred­i­bly com­pet­i­tive key­word. The vis­i­tors that they dri­ve today add more val­ue to the busi­ness today than the cus­tomers that will come to them one and a half to two years down the road.

Tim­o­thy:

That’s true. One last bit. Dig­i­tal is a great medi­um because every­thing can be mea­sured…

Bernard:

Every­thing.

Tim­o­thy:

Yep, when I say every­thing I mean it with all my heart. Every­thing can be mea­sured. Some data bite on the right hand side of your screen. The aver­age ROI on SEO is between $14 – $22 per dol­lar spent. That’s accord­ing to Mar­ket­ing Sherpa’s 2014 report.

Bernard:

But we will per­son­al­ly attest to this. In fact we have a small fam­i­ly owned, well not we, we have a client with a small fam­i­ly owned hotel in Aus­tralia. And they attest to the effec­tive­ness of SEO. They were say­ing that their return on invest­ment was over 2000%. When­ev­er we see feed­back com­ing like that, I know that I’m doing the right thing and it rein­forces why I come here every day. I like mak­ing a dif­fer­ence. To me, I real­ly believe in this Mar­ket­ing Sher­pa report because it is con­sis­tent with the expe­ri­ence that we see with cus­tomers and with clients.

{slide: Nev­er Stop Look­ing For Ways To Dri­ve More Busi­ness Cont.}

We’re just going to sum up most of what we’ve dis­cussed, but before I do that. Last slide on nev­er stop­ping to look for ways to dri­ve more busi­ness. Remem­ber that SEO is one cog in the com­po­nent that is dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing strat­e­gy. And dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing is just a com­po­nent in the big machine that is mar­ket­ing. That’s what SEO is. Remem­ber that it’s there to ful­fill a mar­ket­ing objec­tive and there are sev­er­al mar­ket­ing objec­tives and there are sev­er­al mar­ket­ing strate­gies. But four of the broad­est strate­gies that your cus­tomers will approach you for to help them grow their busi­ness with is they’ll need your help either grow­ing their client base, mean­ing more cus­tomers. If they are a mom and pop shop it’s grow­ing the vis­it fre­quen­cy mean­ing grow­ing the num­ber of, or the num­ber of times a spe­cif­ic cus­tomer walks in into the store. The oth­er one is grow­ing the aver­age dol­lar spend and we showed you an exam­ple of that. The bank that worked with us that increased their bud­get over 10 fold. They grew their aver­age dol­lar spend with us after get­ting their feet wet in terms of what dig­i­tal can achieve for them. And then they could also ask you to help them dif­fer­en­ti­ate from their com­pe­ti­tion and this is a brand­ing strat­e­gy that SEO, PPC, Face­book, all of those cam­paigns could help achieve. But the bot­tom line is, you need to come up with a strat­e­gy and set expec­ta­tions for some­thing that address­es where there’re pri­or­i­ty is. A word of cau­tion. Don’t try to hit all of these in one go. Don’t try to hit all of these in one go. Gun for the ones that either add the most val­ue or the ones that are for the low­est hang­ing fruit. It might be grow­ing their client base and help­ing them dif­fer­en­ti­ate through SEO. These might be a resid­ual objec­tives. And if it’s vis­it fre­quen­cy or longer reten­tion or more cus­tomer faith­ful­ness. It might be social media, it might be your strat­e­gy. But these are what you need to help them achieve in the broad­est of strokes.

{slide: Sum­ma­ry}

Before we wrap up I would just like us to be able to sum­ma­rize the things that we cov­ered in this webi­nar.

Tim­o­thy:

We dis­cussed five point­ers about how to keep your clients and keep them com­ing back for more. The first one we dis­cussed ear­li­er is know­ing your base­line. This is you iden­ti­fy­ing what’s your start­ing point. You need to be able to set your clients whether they are going to be in a con­tract or not. But most of the time, and this is what we rec­om­mend, get them on a con­tract. Get your reten­tion rate high­er. Sec­ond is set­ting your goals. You need to see eye to eye on what you need to estab­lish and what you need to achieve on the client’s end. High­light­ing suc­cess is you sim­ply being the bear­er of the news, whether it’s good news of bad news. Adding more val­ue to your clients is explor­ing oth­er options, more than just SEO, there’s oth­er chan­nels out there. Try doing social, try doing pay per click and maybe a redesign. And the last is nev­er stop look­ing for ways to dri­ve more busi­ness. We’ve talked about how to actu­al­ly gain the client’s trust and strength­en the rela­tion­ship by try­ing to dri­ve more busi­ness to their clients.

Bernard:

And get them to rec­i­p­ro­cate good­will.

Tim­o­thy:

I hope that the base­lines or the point­ers that we’ve dis­cussed pret­ty much gave you enough arse­nal to re-strate­gize and maybe revis­it your method­olo­gies on retain­ing your clients.

{slide: Part­ner Progress Track­er}

Bernard:

Because we’re talk­ing about adding more val­ue to clients inci­den­tal­ly we built the Part­ner Progress Track­er and I real­ly want to say koo­dos to our mar­ket­ing team and our devel­op­ers for devel­op­ing this in time for the webi­nar. Track­ing the growth of your Agency is easy using the part­ner progress track­er. You can fol­low the bit.ly link or you can go into your dash­board and take this from the Resource Cen­ter. It is now avail­able. All you need to do is enter your base­line, set your goals in the spread­sheet and then see your progress month over month over month. It is incred­i­bly impor­tant to hold your­self account­able to what­ev­er your base­line is and what­ev­er your reten­tion goals are. Some­times all it takes to achieve a goal is to have a goal. That being said, we’ve occu­pied 45 min­utes of talk time and it’s time for us to go to the Q&A ses­sion.

{slide: Q&A Ses­sion}

We’ve got one com­ment from one of our atten­dees and it just says, I absolute­ly agree. The com­ment says the beau­ty of the inter­net, we can mea­sure every­thing. And we absolute­ly agree. As we go through the ques­tions I just want­ed to start off with one of the start­ing ques­tions. The first ques­tion we have is:

Which indus­try would you say is the best in terms of reten­tion? Have you guys iden­ti­fied any trends?

This one, a lit­tle dif­fi­cult to answer, but I’ll answer this based on my expe­ri­ence. Tim feel gree to add in which indus­try you think is yours.

Tim­o­thy:

Yeah, absolute­ly.

Bernard:

For me the eas­i­est indus­try to retain is real estate. Any­thing that has to do with, includ­ing hos­pi­tal­i­ty. But when I say real estate, bro­kers, peo­ple that sell hous­es, peo­ple that sell man­age­ment rights and these guys. They are easy to retain because the indus­try is incred­i­bly com­pet­i­tive. They are either doing their dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing or their com­peti­tor is out-dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing them. It’s an incred­i­bly pro­gres­sive indus­try. The oth­er indus­try that I’d day would be easy to retain are inci­den­tal­ly den­tists and chi­ro­prac­tors. They are very enter­pris­ing. And they also know that it’s very com­pet­i­tive. I’m con­stant­ly sur­prised at how savvy den­tal clients are in terms of look­ing at their dig­i­tal vis­i­bil­i­ty.

Tim­o­thy:

To me, I don’t know if you’ll agree with me or not, or some of the atten­dees right here. Based on expe­ri­ence and this is me tak­ing account for the expe­ri­ence I have with the key part­ner, we have here at SEOREseller.com. I guess law firms or lawyers would be one of the indus­tries I’d say, key indus­tries which has a great reten­tion trend.

Bernard:

Also because it is incred­i­bly com­pet­i­tive.

Tim­o­thy:

The com­pe­ti­tion is real­ly high and besides the fact that these guys have enough mon­ey to invest on dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing, they also know that the tra­di­tion­al mar­ket­ing is not the end game for their busi­ness. They want to engage on com­pet­ing with the oth­er lawyers in their area for dig­i­tal mar­ket­ing. And a lot of them are using that today.

Bernard:

I think just to jump into that quick­ly. Most of the lawyer web­sites that we deal with have a strat­e­gy of offer­ing infor­ma­tion up front. Like take for exam­ple they know off the top of their heads. Peo­ple that are plan­ning divorces start doing their research months ahead pri­or to them need­ing a lawyer, so them being the ones that offer that infor­ma­tion up front makes them resource peo­ple. That’s incred­i­ble insight into their indus­try. Lawyers are also incred­i­bly insight­ful in terms of their dig­i­tal pres­ence. The next ques­tion is:

Is it pos­si­ble in your opin­ion to form mean­ing­ful rela­tion­ships with clients that are far away? How do you guys man­age to do it?

Obvi­ous­ly for us, the answer is a resound­ing yes. A lot of you guys are far away from us. A lot our exist­ing part­ners are far away. Because we can’t shake hands with them, we have to sim­u­late the love and the love that we sim­u­late is by being avail­able on Skype, on chat, on LinkedIn, on email, on the phone.

Tim­o­thy:

Yeah.

Bernard:

Five days a week, 24 hours a day. That’s how we man­age to do it. We try to sim­u­late the care, we try to sim­u­late the trust. Because we can’t shake your hand, we have to be there for our part­ners all the time. This one is, I’ll leave Tim to answer this one. And the next ques­tion is:

How do I bal­ance set­ting expec­ta­tions with clos­ing the deal?

Tim­o­thy:

Well, the truth is, the expec­ta­tions has to pro­ceed the close of the deal. You can’t, again I think I men­tioned this ear­li­er in the webi­nar. You can’t promise them the moon and the stars. You have to make sure that what you’re deliv­er­ing to them is some­thing that’s real­is­tic. It’s actu­al­ly some­thing we can deliv­er. Set­ting expec­ta­tions is very impor­tant before you close the deal and this actu­al­ly plays a major role in even retain­ing your clients. It builds your trust with the client and also estab­lish­es your cred­i­bil­i­ty.

Bernard:

I’m mov­ing on to the next ques­tion:

How do I get my foot in the door with a bank or sim­i­lar enter­prise? How did you do it?

I think this is a great ques­tion. For us we exe­cut­ed a growth hack. What we did is, we went and mar­ried a media agency. And when I say we went and mar­ried them, not real­ly mar­ry, mar­ry them, but we part­nered with a media agency that had large enter­pris­es in their pock­et. Because dig­i­tal was not their forte and it was our, we decid­ed to lever­age each other’s strengths. They began intro­duc­ing us to the larg­er indus­tries, the oth­er com­pa­nies that were com­peti­tors of the peo­ple we were work­ing with start­ed tak­ing notice and before we knew it, peo­ple start­ed walk­ing through our door. The two banks I talked about ear­li­er, by the way, they lit­er­al­ly walked in through our door. That’s amaz­ing. There is a ques­tion here and it says:

I work with small­er man­u­fac­tur­ers. Some­times they don’t know how to either access their ana­lyt­ics, or it’s not set­up prop­er­ly. Only on sev­er­al pages. How can you help in this case? Will you assist in fix­ing this or set­ting up the code prop­er­ly on their site?

Great ques­tion. Great ques­tion. And the answer is yes. We are SEO’s. For bet­ter or for worse. This is our bread and but­ter. If a site that you enroll with us does not have ana­lyt­ics, we will cre­ate the ana­lyt­ics account for it. Because we need to see it. We can’t help cus­tomers if we don’t see the data. Most peo­ple say Google is their ora­cle. We sort of takes this a few steps fur­ther. When we say Google is our ora­cle, we’re not just talk­ing about the search net­work. We’re talk­ing about Google, and Ana­lyt­ics and the Search Con­sole and the Web­mas­ter Guide­lines and all of that. We need to see the infor­ma­tion about the client’s site. And we don’t just help you set­up Ana­lyt­ics or set it up cor­rect­ly for you that exists, we also do that for the Search Con­sole. I hope that answered the ques­tion. The oth­er one is:

Where do our mar­gins come into play?

Your mar­gins are, and I guess these were dis­cussed in the pre­vi­ous webi­na­rs. What we rec­om­mend is for you to charge dou­ble to triple what the rates are inside the agency dash­board. They seem to be com­pet­i­tive­ly priced and they seem to be indus­try stan­dard. The rea­son our pric­ing is priced the way it is, is because it seems to be the most fea­si­ble. One thing that I always want­ed to say is that we’re not the cheap­est provider and that you get what you pay for. We try to offer a pre­mi­um expe­ri­ence and we try to offer pre­mi­um results. And this is why we charge accord­ing­ly to those expe­ri­ences as well. Plus run­ning an office with 131 dig­i­tal mar­keters, not cheap.

Tim­o­thy:

I want to just pick up on what Bernard said about mar­gins. That’s true you have to mark your prices up about 2 – 3 times the price we’re offer­ing you. But I guess in my opin­ion, if you’re offer­ing your client a ser­vice like a one off ser­vice mean­ing it’s not SEO, it’s not pay per click, it’s not a recur­ring cam­paign. Let’s say web­site design and you don’t have any guar­an­tee whether the client is going to con­tin­ue after that or not. I’d say go as high as 400%, you don’t have any lever­age for them to con­tin­ue after that unless you put them on a con­tract, which is what we dis­cussed ear­li­er.

Bernard:

Anoth­er fair­ly inter­est­ing, prob­a­bly a sen­si­tive ques­tion too. The next ques­tion is:

Have you had the sit­u­a­tion where you couldn’t deliv­er for a client and had to let them go? When do you let go?

This is a great ques­tion. I’ll take the time to answer this and I think Tim has a way to answer this based off his expe­ri­ence. To be per­fect­ly hon­est, these sit­u­a­tions have hap­pened a cou­ple of times and I believe that they hap­pened because we didn’t do the right thing at the start of the rela­tion­ship. We did not choose to become the expert in order to obtain someone’s expert, we pre­ma­ture­ly said yes. And decid­ed to engage with­out a clear under­stand­ing of where our abil­i­ty to deliv­er was. We real­ized this very quick­ly by the way, and then we do a revis­it with cus­tomers with clients at the 3 – 6 month tenure of the cam­paign and we tell them; we need to revis­it the goal, we need to revis­it the key­word, or what­ev­er it was that wasn’t done cor­rect­ly. Because we want to be able to achieve results for you today. We don’t want you to wait, one, two, three years down the line in order to earn rank­ings for that incred­i­bly com­pet­i­tive key­word. When we can’t see eye to eye, and I don’t just mean this to high­light the moral imper­a­tive. But peo­ple in this office will lit­er­al­ly lose sleep if we’re tak­ing anyone’s mon­ey with­out adding val­ue. It’s just not some­thing we believe in. And so there are times when that has to lead to a part­ing of ways. We try to do it as ami­ca­bly as we can. We try to deliv­er val­ue for what­ev­er any­one pays for.

Tim­o­thy:

For me I think it’s when we think on the onset of the cam­paign, upon our analy­sis or upon our research we actu­al­ly, we make sure that we can actu­al­ly deliv­er results for the client. There are some unfore­seen events or maybe algo­rithm updates or actu­al­ly affects the strat­e­gy we’ve put in place, we’ve had to change it dras­ti­cal­ly. There are times that we are not able to deliv­er and this is because we have not fore­seen what’s going to hap­pen. There’s always some­time where you have to throw the tow­el in and say; we did the best we could and it’s time that we pause or we can­cel this cam­paign because we don’t want to be tak­ing our client’s mon­ey for some­thing we are not able to deliv­er.

Bernard:

Anoth­er tough ques­tion. You guys are ask­ing tough ques­tions:

Some of my clients have a pr per­son who con­trols some of the con­tent cre­ation, news, press releas­es etc, but they don’t under­stand SEO. How­ev­er they’re very crit­i­cal of the qual­i­ty of con­tent for blog posts and so on and so forth. How scal­able is the qual­i­ty of your con­tent cre­ation? Can you han­dle tech­ni­cal, med­ical con­tent, which is very spe­cif­ic to that ver­ti­cal space?

Great ques­tion. I’ll answer them point by point. The ide­al way to do it, is to be in con­stant con­tact with the pr per­son. Remem­ber because we are the agency that exe­cutes the work, we don’t talk direct­ly to the clients, to the cus­tomers or their agents. And this is why you, as the part­ner, this is what you as the part­ner, this is your account­abil­i­ty. This is your respon­si­bil­i­ty. Being sure that the pr per­son is col­lab­o­ra­tive with you at every step of the way. There are ways to over­come the dis­con­nect. This is the intake forms and the cus­tomer briefs that need to be filled out. If there are spe­cif­ic instruc­tions, those can be filled out there. I’ll move on to the next ques­tion, which is, they’re very crit­i­cal about the con­tent cre­at­ed for blog posts etc. And they should be. Blog posts, news releas­es, is ghost writ­ing for the client. It rep­re­sents the busi­ness. It must sound like their voice. One of the things that we try to remind clients is remem­ber we don’t live and breathe those brands. The bet­ter that the briefs are filled out, the more we are able to sim­u­late what it’s like being in the shoes of the busi­ness own­er or the peo­ple that are in that busi­ness. More than that, in terms of blog posts, they’re free to send it back for as many revi­sions as they need until we get it right. We fre­quent­ly exe­cute cal­i­bra­tions between our project man­ag­er, our edi­tors and our con­tent writ­ers. In order to get the con­tent as per­fect, or as near per­fect as we can. But I think it’s prop­er that the pr per­son is metic­u­lous when it comes to the con­tent that’s post­ed on the client web­site. How scal­able is the qual­i­ty of your con­tent cre­ation? It’s pret­ty scal­able, it’s pret­ty scal­able. There’s an army of writ­ers in the office and we pro­duce over 6000 pieces of con­tent vary­ing from prod­uct descrip­tions of 50 words to in-depth arti­cles of over 2000 words. It’s very scal­able. Then how do you han­dle tech­ni­cal med­ical indus­try con­tent which is very spe­cif­ic to that ver­ti­cal? We have writ­ing rules. Tech­ni­cal and med­ical, so to get a bit tech­ni­cal, we make sure that the read­abil­i­ty score and the read­ing e‑score are com­pli­ant with how tech­ni­cal the indus­try is. Our writ­ers do a lot of research. Our project man­agers proof read these. Our edi­tors proof read this and then we sub­mit them to the client for approval. all arti­cles are very well researched.

We’re going to wrap up the webi­nar after one more ques­tion and I’m just try­ing to decide which one I should use because these are real­ly amaz­ing ques­tions. I guess I’ll start with this:

I don’t always have the time to spend on build­ing my client rela­tion­ships because I’m out there try­ing to sign new deals. Are there any hacks to over­come this?

I’ll answer this. There is a way to hack it. Use the dash­board. The dash­board is meant to sim­u­late love and car­ing. It’s meant to sim­u­late car­ing. That’s what we designed it for. That’s why it’s vis­i­ble with your brand­ing on it, with no trace to us, with a white label URL, vis­i­ble from their mobile or from wher­ev­er they are. They can view the per­for­mance of their cam­paign while they’re wait­ing on a deliv­ery truck to replace a flat tire or some­thing. But it is designed to sim­u­late love and car­ing. The reports are auto­mat­i­cal­ly gen­er­at­ed and sent to your mail­box. This sort of goes back to one of the point­ers we dis­cussed. In terms of the first Boost Your Busi­ness webi­nar. If you’re out there get­ting more clients to fall in love with you and your busi­ness and what you believe in, you need to know when to ask for help. It might be time to have a VA, it might be time to hire a VA, bring in a part­ner, but some­thing that allows you to scale your busi­ness. Ini­tial­ly, you’ll be able to be your own busi­ness own­er and sales­man and project man­ag­er, but that’s sort of got a low lid or a glass ceil­ing that you’ll hit. In order for you guys to scale prop­er­ly you need to know when to ask for help. Whether that’s in the form of a vir­tu­al assis­tant or not, we also have solu­tions in the office that can help you. Feel free to talk to a project man­ag­er and ask about it.

Tim­o­thy:

Or talk to me.

Bernard:

Or talk to Tim. With that I just want­ed to say thank you very much for spend­ing anoth­er hour with us. We’ll keep doing these webi­na­rs for so long as you guys keep com­ing in. Feel free to sched­ule a call with us through the bit.ly link. They’re on the screen which is bit.ly/getsked and feel free to call us at any time if you guys have any ques­tions. Those are our US, and Aus­tralian num­bers. You can also email us at info@seoreseller.com and ask for Tim.

Tim­o­thy:

Yep. You know my exten­sion is 1013, just give me a call and I’d like to say thank you Bernard for hav­ing me in this webi­nar. It’s been a blast.

Bernard:

My plea­sure. It won’t be the last time I’ll have you. And thank you very much to every­body that joined us. I’ll see you guys on the next webi­nar.

Tim­o­thy:

Thank you guys.

Bernard:

Your time was appre­ci­at­ed.

Scroll to Top